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PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2012 21:55:47 pm 
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I was online for Post Number 3 MILLION!
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Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 21:40:25 pm
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Location: Kirkcaldy, Kingdom of Fife, Scotland
Basically I mean any cover which you research and uncover anything of interest. I got this cover in a big miscellaneous carton a few weeks ago, and was basically looking through them to see if I could find anything to put up on stamp boards, i.e SOTN, Censored etc. When I spotted this one I thought - ah it's a addressed to a "Sir" this could do for letters to or from Famous People, so I did some googling, as I had no idea about this Sir John Mclaren who sent this cover.

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I looked up A.F.H.Godfrey(not noticing it was addressed to MRS not Mr) and found this engagement notice from the Brisbane Courier Mail.

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Which makes it perfect for this cover, so I then looked up May Alexandra Mclaren to whom the cover was sent, and found the following details on the Nashwood Genealogy site at : http://www.nashwood-designs.com/nashwood/getperson.php?personID=I4662&tree=1

May Alexandra was born in Annandale, NSW in 1906 and Married Anthony Frederick Halliday Godfrey in June 1934. Anthony was killed on 17 October 1939 in France he hasd risen to the rank of Major. May gave birth to Anthony John on 24 April 1940, 6 months after her husbands death.

The cover was sent to May from her father Sir John in December 1939.

I know many of you, particularly Brummie does lots of research on covers, stamps etc., and I just thought if it hadn't been done already we could have a dedicated thread to cover research stories.

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PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2012 23:19:14 pm 
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I was online for Post Number 3 MILLION!
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I'd love this topic :mrgreen:

Sir John Gilbert McLaren
http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/mclaren-sir-john-gilbert-7408


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PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2012 23:51:24 pm 
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I was online for Post Number 3 MILLION!
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I thought this would be right up your street Brummie :D

This is the entry in the Commonwealth War Grave Commission site

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PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2012 00:30:29 am 
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Most interesting!

I wrote a post on my blog not so long ago, about a cover which I found for $2 in a dealer's good old bargain box.

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Thanks to member bazza4338 here, who, in another thread, helped me discover who the recipient was. What do you know - turns out Frederick Morawski is still alive to this day!

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There's even an interview with him (http://www.ccsu.edu/page.cfm?p=9065) as well as photos, and his discharge papers! :D

Born in April, 1924, in Buenos Aires, Morawski enlisted into the 2nd Division of the United States Marine Corps reserve in 1942, at the ripe young age of 18. He was deployed to the Pacific Theatre where he fought numerous island campaigns, including Tarawa, Guadalcanal, Saipan and Guam.

The harsh and extremely vicious nature of jungle warfare taught him important survival tactics, such as the ability to move around whilst avoiding Japanese snipers. His brother, John, who also served in the Marines, never came home.

Only Frederick, now a Corporal, managed to return to the US, later completing a degree at Yale University, Connecticut. He is still alive today, aged 88 at the time of writing.

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PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2012 07:32:01 am 
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Hi

Here is a postcard I found in a very low cost auction lot I recently won.

Knowing that the Camp de Saint-Cyprien on the eastern coast of France close to the border with Spain had been built to receive Spanish refugees from the civil war, I was surprised to be confronted with a German-language text dated in 1940, well after the end of the Spanish Civil War.

A short Google search taught me that the camp was reopened to house the Jews rounded up in Belgium in May 1940, just after the invasion of Belgium by German troops. Many of these had fled the persecution in Germany within the previous few years. Shortly after, these detainees were shipped to Southern France whence they were later sent to the Eastern extermination camps.

The writer of this card, Max Kopf, was a German Jew from Hamburg who had fled to Belgium and was arrested in Brussels. There is a book in French called «La liste de Saint-Cyprien» naming all known detainees who passed through this camp, about 8000 of them. An English-language summary and list of detainees in .pdf format is available on the site of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum : http://www.ushmm.org/
Sorry, once on the site, I cannot link to the document. I can only access it through a Google search «max kopf saint cyprien» It is the first document that comes up. Max Kopf is named and his few known details given.

My German is not very good to start with, so I have difficulty understanding the message. No doubt some of our members fluent in German can provide a better translation than I could.

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Memphre

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PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2012 07:52:22 am 
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I was online for Post Number 3 MILLION!
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You were right Donald, it is something I love to do, it brings the letter to life.

Here is a link to see the final resting place of Anthony Frederick Halliday Godfrey
http://twgpp.org/information.php?id=3022832

Ben I just read your blog about Frederick Morawski, little does he know that on the other side of the world somebody has this cover that was sent to him all those years ago, great write up.


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PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2012 04:00:03 am 
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I was online for our Birthday Number 5!
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Great thread Donald :)

Here is a Malta postcard I recently got from eBay (I got it for £3, it's catalogued at €9)

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The card was issued in 1917 and is used on the 11th of February 1926 (still in-period - next postcards were issued in 1927). It is uprated by a 1924 1d bright violet Melita stamp (½d was the local rate, 1½d to Europe).

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The postcard was sent from Rupert Forbes-Bentley of Birchircara (now Birkirkara, Malta's most populated city) to J. Mae Ivor of Le Cannet, France.

The typewritten message reads:

Dear Sir,

Many thanks for your letter of the 5th received yesterday. I am unable to supply a block of the 2½d in the other shade just yet. The 2½d deep blue is also obsolete, and a new issue of 2½d stamp and a new 3d are expected very shortly.

Yours faithfully,

R. Forbes-Bentley


Apparently Rupert Forbes-Bentley was an English airman (and stamp collector) living in Malta between the Wars. I found this link about him:

http://www.auspostalhistory.com/articles/1730.shtml

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The 2½d stamps mentioned in the letter are the 1925 2½d on 3d stamps in cobalt and bright ultramarine (probably the "deep blue" mentioned in the letter):

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(the shades look different in real life)


The "new issue of 2½d stamp and a new 3d" refers to the 2½d ultramarine and 3d black on yellow which were issued just five days after this postcard was sent (on 16 February 1926):

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 01:28:04 am 
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Another cover of Rupert Forbes-Bentley:

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There's no return address, but the red wax seal says R.F.B. and the typwriter ink is the same as the card.

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Another interesting thing about this cover is that the stamps are the 2½d ultramarine and 3d black on yellow which were issued on 16 February 1926. The postmark on this cover is one day later - 17 February 1926.
Is there such a thing as a second day cover?

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 22:47:30 pm 
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The Colonisation of New Zealand

Unearthed by a short letter – c. March 1841

A write-up of a cover originally discussed here

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Transcription

Address:
William Wilkins Esq
Sarn Fawr
Bridgend
Glamorgan

Letter:

Monday

Dear William

This is mainly to acknowledge your letter respecting John Williams and to say that immediately after its receipt I wrote to Woolcombe reminding him of our conversation when I proposed that John he, Wms, should occupy the Berth vacated by Mores, and of him asking me at the time whether Wms was married for in which case he could not go as those ?? [deleted?] rooms only for a Batchelor - My answer removed that difficulty & I considered his consent obtained.

I requested him to write his reply direct either to you or to John Williams whose address I gave him – I am extremely busy for to-morrow my luggage goes on board, & will be removed to the wharf this evening, so excuse the haste with which I write - & tell Caroline that her letter came also by the same post & that I will answer it before I leave London which will be Friday

Yrs Sincerely L H Davey

Notes:
Written by Capt Leyson Hopkins Davey to William Wilkins; his son-in-law.
Caroline is his daughter, married to William Wilkins, 8th October 1840.
Thomas Woollcombe is Managing Director – the Plymouth Company of New Zealand.

Additionally - Capt L H Davey is retired from the Honourable East India Company and built Sarn Fawr in 1821.

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Sarn Fawr

Background

The letter is written by Capt Leyson Hopkins Davey to his son-in-law William Wilkins regarding a berth on a ship for a John Williams.

The ship turns out to be the Amelia Thompson, of the Plymouth Company of New Zealand, second of two ships carrying the first settlers out to the new colony of New Plymouth. The Amelia Thompson left Plymouth on 25th March 1841, arrived Wellington 2nd August 1841 and after a stay of 2 weeks arrived New Plymouth 3rd September 1841.

On-board are a Capt Leyson Hopkins Davey, age 58, and a son, age 10. They are cabin passengers. And in steerage there is a John Williams, age 37, yeoman.

The letter is written in London and refers to his luggage being collected that evening and transported to the wharf, presumably to sail to Plymouth. There is a stamp on the back of the letter which I can’t make out, but I would guess it was written late February / early March for the Amelia Thompson to leave Plymouth on the 25th March.

Settlement of New Plymouth

Towards the end of 1838 or in early 1839, the New Zealand Company was formed by Mr Edward Gibbon Wakefield with the intention of settling a colony the other side of the World. On May 12th 1839 he and his settlers set sail from the West Pier of Sutton Harbour in the "Tory", an event commemorated by a plaque near the spot.

Whether or not the party sent word back to Plymouth that they had arrived in New Zealand is not clear but certainly the spirit shown in setting out on the voyage prompted local merchants to form the Plymouth Company of New Zealand on 25th January 1840. Under the leadership of the Earl of Devon as governor, Mr Thomas Gill as deputy governor and Mr Thomas Woollcombe as managing director, the Company purchased 60,000 acres from the New Zealand Company.

On 19th November 1840 they despatched the first party of 64 adults and 70 children aboard the "William Bryan". As a result, New Plymouth was founded on North Island.

A second ship, the “Amelia Thompson” with 182 passengers, left Plymouth on 25th March 1841, arrived Wellington 2nd August 1841 and after a stay of 2 weeks arrived New Plymouth 3rd September 1841.

The Plymouth Company sent out six ships in all, carrying 897 emigrants, before their enterprise was brought to a halt by the failure of their London bankers.

New Plymouth - 1841: The First Settlers

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The first of the town’s settlers arrived on the William Bryan, which anchored off the coast on March 31, 1841. In steerage were 21 married couples, 22 single adults and 70 children. George Cutfield, the head of the expedition, wrote a letter home, describing the settlement as "a fine country with a large quantity of flat land, but every part is covered with vegetation, fern, scrub and forest. The fern, on good land, is generally from four to six feet high. There are thousands of acres of this land which will require but a trifling outlay to bring into cultivation.”

Temporary housing sites had been provided on Mount Eliot, and frustrations mounted as settlers were forced to squat in homes built of rushes and sedges through winter, amid flourishing numbers of rats, dwindling food supplies and rising unease over the prospects of a repeat raid by Waikato Maori. The first suburban sections were not available until October, while those who had bought town sections were forced to wait until mid-November.

The second ship, Amelia Thompson, arrived off the coast on September 3 and sat off shore for five weeks because its captain feared its reputation as a dangerous shipping area. Its 187 passengers were helped ashore over the course of two weeks, each small boatload taking five hours to row from the vessel to the shore. The ship's precious food cargo, including flour and salted meat, was finally brought ashore for New Plymouth's starving residents on September 30. The loss of its baggage ship, the Regina, which was blown ashore on to a reef, contributed to New Plymouth's reputation as a dangerous area for shipping, discouraging other vessels from berthing.

By one account, settlers were by now "moaning vociferously about having ever left England. Living was a continual battle to shield themselves against the elements and their food supplies against termites, insects and hungry animals. Drunkenness was rife among the labourers in a dreary existence with too little to do. Flour supplies had run out again and there was no likelihood of more until the next boatload of settlers arrived. "

As summer arrived, buildings began to be erected, gardens planted and wheat sown. Other ships soon arrived to provide more labour and food supplies: the Oriental (130 passengers) on November 7, 1841; the Timandra (202 passengers) on February 23, 1842; the Blenheim (138 passengers) on November 19, 1842; and the Essex (115 passengers) on January 25, 1843, by which time the town was described as a collection of raupo and pitsawn timber huts housing almost 1000 Europeans.

The Penny Black stamp is interesting, the postmarks are interesting, the cover itself is interesting (over 170 years old), but the story is fascinating :!: - Dave :D


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2012 22:13:19 pm 
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I’m hoping that my little offering here can add some value to this excellent thread.

Whilst the time frame is not quite as old as many others here, I found a number of ‘Barbados covers’ offered on Ebay last year as a single lot and looking at the picture one caught my eye.

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It was an envelope addressed to H Frank Deakin and whilst the stamps were nothing particular to speak of I recognised the name. The British West Indies Study circle have a publication (which I bought in 2010) called ‘Classic Collections - Frank Deakin’s Barbados’ and I rather hoped that it would be the same Frank Deakin.

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So I bid and won the covers for 99p which pleased me enormously, and lo and behold when it arrived I checked and it is addressed to the man himself.

Now I’m not sure if Frank is still alive, the last mention I can find of him on ‘tinterweb’ is as a patron of the Postal Museum in Bath and it says he is unwell http://www.bathpostalmuseum.co.uk/patrons.html and I’m fairly sure that his collection has been sold off (or maybe I’ve imagined this bit...)

Pleased with my lot and happily filing the rest of the covers away in an album I came across this one at the bottom of the pile.

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Not evident from the photograph and an unassuming item, it is however from Edmund Bayley who is the author of ‘the’ definitive tome on the stamps of Barbados (still on sale today from Veratrinder http://veratrinder.org/stamps-barbados-p-3373.html). Imagine my delight when I opened it up to find this....

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Not only is it a wonderful insight into two of the foremost modern collectors of Barbados stamps it is also a fascinating snapshot of the process of the revisions he found necessary to make to his book which was subsequently republished in 1989.

Whilst I was in Barbados three years ago I attempted to track down a stamp dealer on the island and all paths led me to just one place, Keith H Bayley who is the principal dealer on the island and if memory serves, the brother of Edmund.

Amazing how much history can be garnered from one small aerogramme.

Jon

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 20:25:42 pm 
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I was online for Post Number 3 MILLION!
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Above you can read the transcription and translation of the card memphre showed a few days ago. Lazy as I am, I let the program do a first translation and corrected afterwards. Please do not hesitate to do corrections yourself.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 23:00:13 pm 
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Hi Heinz

Thanks for your translation. There is a feeling the author was not aware of his imminent transport to some Eastern concentration camp where he died. A sad memento of an immense man-made tragedy.

Memphre

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 19:27:55 pm 
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What a fantastic thread!

Cheers Manfaefife, I love finding out about the background of stamps and covers. A 10p stamp and cover can have a fascinating story. Great stuff :D

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