Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

News items. General trends, new issues, new policies etc. **Whatever** you like. WORLDWIDE. Start a new thread on your question. Please do not discuss ebay in THIS forum as we have a separate and popular Forum for that discussion.

Moderator: Volunteer Moderator Team

Post Reply
User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by samcam »

In 2006 I took upon myself to do some paper type reserch on Australian stamps starting from the decimal issues and I became too involved in the project that I started asking around web forums, received some favourable responses and gathered data from a number of sources. I had to include pre-decimals as I found some paper variations there too, I am not talking about the Helecon or White paper varieties only - it is about paper fluorescence, striations, paper fibre and much more.

Sadly I don;t have a Brusden White catalog so all my search was done online and with help from other enthusiasts. This was done way back in 2006 and it was lying dormant as there were other things which took my fancy (US paper types) but since I found this group I was thinking of posting my research and see how people responds :D

All I am seeking is more help from Specialists - please read on so that you can have an idea of what I am after.
Saleem

AUSTRALIA PAPER VARIATION NOTES

Saleem M Khan


SHADES - PAPER - FLUORESCENCE

Most stamp issues may include flaws in the minute class, variations in shades and paper, and degrees of fluorescence, the now wide use of the ultra violet lamp accentuates the extremes to which these matters may be carried.

Shades: The specialised inks are mixed to a precise formula by competent laboratory personnel, and despite that every endeavour is made to ensure subsequent supplies match the initial colours, some shade difference is inevitable, particularly over a long period of issue of a stamp. A shade may also appear different depending on variations of paper and surface coating; further, a worn doctor blade removes less ink from the printing plate thus causing a deeper tonal effect.

Paper: Paper is manufactured to certain specifications so far as ingredient content is concerned, but composition and tone varies a little within tolerable limits according to the country of origin. The surface, or both sides, may be treated with a sizing compound before application of a whitening agent (coating), both of which may react to ultra-violet light. In addition, excessive exposure to U.V. radiation, or even natural light (which contains U.V. rays) over a period of several months only, causes the whitening agent to break down slightly and the toning tends to cream.

Fluorescence: Since the introduction of phosphor coating on postage stamps in Australia in 1963, only two types, virtually identical in characteristics, have been used, viz: Helecon 3336 (made in U.S.A.), and Derby CPS39R (made in U.K.). Although these are stable compounds, the luminescence varies according to strength of application in tones of red, pink and orange, very weak to strong.

Irrespective of this, the A.P.O. requirement is that the Helecon content be sufficient to activate the automatic postmarking machines. Full details regarding Helecon and its use are contained in A.P.O. Philatelic Bulletin No. 72, June 1965, which also recommends viewing of stamps so treated through a suitable filter (Wratten No. 25) to retard visible blue light.

It is obvious therefore that each factor has some bearing on the other and the combination of the three would tend to assume proportions somewhat bewildering to the potential, and even to the moderate specialist. This may be capitalised upon and over-emphasised to some extent


HELECON IN AUSTRALIAN POSTAGE STAMPS

Helecon is the commercial term for a phosphor substance of the Zinc Sulphide group which when excited by ultra-violet radiation in the 3000 - 4000 angstrom range, fluoresces brightly in the orange-red range of the spectrum and retains the luminescence for a fraction of a second after removal of the radiation source.

This substance has been incorporated into Australian postage stamps for purposes associated with electronic sorting, facing and cancelling of letters and postal articles. Helecon is included either in the printing ink or impregnated in the surface coating of the paper.

Satisfactory results were obtained from in experimental printing on Helecon paper of four million 11d stamps in 1963, and the stamps were released for general sale in December 1963, the next printing of the 11d being on normal white paper and released in September 1964. Not all pound, shilling & pence values were so treated, nor was there a specific date of issue in any instance.

Although colour changes were NOT made, slight shade variations are apparent due primarily to the inking effect on ordinary untreated and Helecon treated papers. The only certain method of positively identifying Helecon is by use of the ultra-violet lamp.

STAMP PAPERS 1964 - 1971

Wiggins Teape and Harrison were the two suppliers of paper for stamp printing. Wiggins Teape owned both Shoalhaven Mills (N.SW.), where the paper was produced and Samuel Jones & Co, where the paper was coated and gummed.

From 1964 to 1971 stamp papers were produced to reflect the quality of the reproduction and the Post Office requirements relating to the facer cancelling machines. Technical printing problems relating to the clarity of the finished print had to be solved when phosphorescence was introduced into the paper
in 1964. Experiments and trials conducted by Samuel Jones at their Keon Park, Victoria factory resulted in the acceptance of KP5D (Keon Park Fifth Trial Making, Sample D) designated paper being introduced during the Christmas 1971 issue.

The Gum used was more or less yellowish "gum arabic". The overall appearance of the paper is however white compared to the original Wiggins Teape paper in use at this time.

When "gum arabic" became scarce and too expensive in 1973 trials of a new gum, Polyvinyl Alcohol, were made and this gum was subsequently applied to the base paper. This paper is termed KP6T (Keon Park Sixth Trial Making, T for tropical). It proved difficult to identify the sides of the unprinted sheets so a pink tint was added to the gum and trialled.

This however proved to be unsatisfactory due to the tint affecting the colour matching. A blue lint however proved satisfactory. The KP6T paper was initially for the sheet fed printing presses and subsequently for the Chambon roll fed presses. KP5D was used for the Chambon Press printings until the KP6T paper became available in rolls. This arrangement lasted until the Post Office began contracting stamp printing to private companies.

EXPERIMENTS IN STAMP GUM

Due to world-wide shortage of gum arabic, an alternative adhesive, polyvinyl acetate (PVA) was used, to determine its suitability for postage stamps it was applied on a quantity of 5,580,000, 7c. Agate distributed to post offices in Ballarat, Bendigo and Geelong areas in Victoria during November 1973. Supplies were also made available at Philatelic Bureaux.
Paper variation, unidentifiable, was also used for fresh printings of 7c Q.E.II, $1, $2, $4 Navigators

GEORGE VI Issues on Thin Paper
The stamps of this reign were printed as before by the Note Printing Branch of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. All new issues were rotary recess-printed.

There is some variation in the thickness of the paper used for these issues. following measurements are of unused stamps with full gum, the measurement being taken over the printed stamp, not over blank selvedge. Stamps on ordinary watermarked paper average about .09 mm in thickness (.0035 inches) For those who wish to collect thin paper varieties, a watermarked stamp gauging less than .08 mm (.0031 inches) may be classed as thin.

Stamps on unwatermarked paper average about .085 mm (.0033 inches). The unwatermarked thin paper variety should gauge less than .075 mm (.0030 inches). For stamps without gum the above measurements should be decreased by about .004 mm (.0002 inches).

In the case of the 5/, 10/ and £1 Robes it was at one time customary to speak of 'thick' paper and 'thin' paper issues. Properly speaking the distinction is between chalk-surfaced paper and ordinary paper.

WHITE PAPER

In mid. 1964 a whiter type of watermarked paper than the cream wove type was introduced at the Note Printing Branch. The 5/-, 7/6 and £2 Navigators were printed on this white paper, also fresh printings of 5/- Cattle Industry, £1 Bass, 10/- Flinders, 2/6 Aborigine, 2/ Golden Whistler, 2/5 Blue Wren were on this paper.

NOTE: The 2/5 Wren - colouring on the cream paper is duller and the fern is brown, rather than orange-brown In actual fact, the first printings were on Wiggins Teape paper without colour bars (autotrons) on the sheets, whereas the stocks printed on Harrison paper with autotrons comprised the initial release.

Notes on Queen Elizabeth II last pre-decimal definitives

1. The colour change from green to red was associated with the introduction of electronic face-canceller equipment and the use of Helecon.

2. Helecon paper. A small quantity was printed thereon. In sheet form the gummed side reacts and the stamps are moderately scarce. Two varieties exist on such paper, In booklets the Helecon coating is on the printed side and the incidence is very rare, two mint and several only used copies being known to date.

The use of an infra-red filter is strongly recommended when detecting the presence of Helecon with the U.V. lamp to offset the effect of other luminescent substances (fillers, coatings, etc.) which may be present and mislead. This applies also to soaked stamps where Helecon transfer can occur.

3. Booklet sheets were available at Philatelic Bureaux from July 1964 until stocks became exhausted consequent upon the colour change, booklets issued on 13 July 1965 were not available in sheet form

4. Non-Helecon ink booklets are very rare mint, these appear to have formed approximately 5% of the total booklet issue in Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia.

DECIMAL CURRENCY

The Australian decimal series of definitive issues are printed on Helecon-impregnated paper.

For example the 4c stamps in both sheets and booklets are on this paper, however, collectors should be forever on the alert as there could be releases on ordinary paper due to accident or design.

Initially the Q.E. 4c value was issued on ordinary paper with Helecon in the ink to utilize earlier supplies of paper, but early in 1966 the Note Printing Branch began several test printings on experimental papers impregnated with Helecon. The stocks thereby accumulated were released in January 1967 in the normal way to N.S.W. and Victoria, the States where electronic mail-handling equipment is installed, and shortly afterwards through the Philatelic Bureaux.

All the experimental printings were made on Wiggins Teape paper containing Helecon in categories as under:

1. (a) Helecon coated with starch binder
(b) Derby luminescence coated with starch binder.
(There is no basic difference in these classes of paper, both of which were manufactured in the United Kingdom.)

2. Helecon coated with starch binder.
Manufactured at Shoalhaven, N.S.W., and shows a marked stipple under ultra-violet radiation.

3. Derby luminescence coated with Latex-Manutex binder manufactured in the United Kingdom:
(a) in sheets
(b) in booklets
Example : 4c Red
Ordinary paper, Helecon ink
Helecon paper, categories 1, 3 above
Helecon paper, category 2 above
Non-Helecon paper (only 3 used known)

-MORE RESEARCH-

A watermarked Harrison white paper was introduced to the note printing branch in mid 1964. This paper replaced the supply of Wiggins Teape watermarked cream paper.

The first issue to be affected with this new, genuinely whiter, paper was the 5/- cattle in June 1964. Previous printruns of this value used two different Wiggins Teape cream papers. Subsequently, further printruns of the then partially complete Navigator series are found on this white paper (10sh, 1 pound). Previous printings were in cream. Remaining issues of the Navigator series, one of which replaced the 5/- cattle, were ONLY printed on this newer, whiter, watermarked paper.

It is erroneously stated in catalogues that the emergency 2/6d Aborigine was from the same watermarked paper stock of mid 1964. The reality is that the paper used in the 1965 was far more bleached than when this issue was first introduced in 1952. In September 1965, stocks of the 2/6d Robin had run out, the Chambon press was preparing for the decimal issues.

To overcome the shortage, electros containing imprint AND no imprint were utilised. A total of 85,064* stamps were issued on unwatermarked white paper. The odd quantity reflects the destruction of residual stock at decimalisation.

1d. violet Queen Elizabeth
This stamp had a remarkable print run from 2/2/1959 to the end of the pre decimal era in late '65. Printings from 1965 are noticeable as being considerably 'whiter' than the others. No doubt, print stock had run out and any suitable paper available was used during this year of turmoil when helecon issues came on stream.

2sh3d green Wattles
The so called 2/3d white paper of 1964, was simply a comparison against the maize paper which had run out and was not re-ordered. This issue was subsequently re-printed again on helecon coated paper in 1965. Additional print-runs were required of this heavily used parcel value to the UK. The maize paper had run out and fresh printings occurred on ordinary (white) paper. Like many helecon issues, the image is washed out and significantly paler.

2sh5d Wren
Again, this 'white' paper cannot be compared to that supplied for the recess print machinery. This stock was especially supplied in rolls.

Trial printings were carried out on Wiggins Teape cream paper in 1962 and held in reserve. The first issued printings for all the bird series was on Harrison white paper during 1964/5. The trial printing of the 2/5d wren was later released as emergency stock 15th July 1965 just at the end of the pre-decimal era when the Chambon press was flat out producing new, decimal, issues.

Further studies by me have unearthed some more data regarding Australian paper used for stamp printing. Haven't heard anything from Brusden White people or other Aussie Specialists except one guy who plainly stated that I may have disturbed a lot of people who don't look twice at the low value pre-decimal and early decimal Aussie issues as an Australian Specialist means someone who studies either the Kangaroo issues or the King George V issues. Sadly the period I picked up is ignored mainly due to the immense work required for studies. The questions are:

1- The stamp paper was prepared at one location and coated at another location - Is it possible that some lots are printed on the coated sides while other lots are printed on the uncoated side of paper?

2- There is also a possibility that the two types of Helecon substance used - reacts differently with the long wave Ultra Violet lamps.

3- Another possibility is that once the printers ran out of one particular type os paper another type would have been used for next printing of definitives which are printed more than once.

4- Early printings on 'chalk surfaced paper' could well be on normal uncoated paper due to the same reason as above.

5- There is one Aussie dealer who is listing two paper varieties for most of the issues of this period and for later definitive series - are the other specialised Aussie dealers ignoring the varieties because it would be too much work for small returns?
6- it is possible that Australia Post would not even know how the paper was produced. They would have contracted for a quantity of paper of "x" quality, and if delivered to standard, that would be the end. Only the manufacturer could tell us how it was produced.

Some more data related to paper type that I have found on the net and have used it here with thanks in advance to Glenn and others who have helped unknowingly.

"Watermark Error" article by Glen Stephens

A new error has turned up 70 years after being mailed. For decades I have been a member of the Australian Commonwealth Collector's Club. I almost never attend meetings, (laziness!) but do find much of interest in the bi-monthly "Bulletin" Journals.

Annual membership dues to ACCC for Australians are $A30, and $A50 for overseas members. Remittances to GPO Box 1971, Sydney. NSW. 2001. Current Editor of the "Bulletin" is Dr. Geoff Kellow, also Editor of the superlative range of Australian Specialist Catalogues. (ACSC)

Dr Kellow ran an article that fascinated me in the August "Bulletin" reporting a new watermark error discovery.
A John Greenaway from Canberra had discovered a new error on a 1931 2d Red KGV CofA watermark stamp - SG 127.

The "C" of the C of A watermark had been soldered on backwards in one position. i.e. the C was reversed (or mirror imaged) from where it would normally be. The C in the upper middle of the error stamp reads in positive - looking at it from the back of the stamp, where watermarks show clearest on this (indeed most) issues.

Worldwide convention is that watermarks are catalogue listed and illustrated as they show from the FRONT of the stamp. Hopefully the illustrations nearby will give you a clearer idea. Remember these illustrations are what you see from the FRONT of the stamp.

Kellow says: "there is no question as to the genuineness of the variety". The 2d KGV is postmarked at "Koo-Wee-Rup" Victoria in September 1935.

Watermarks are made by pressing a mesh of steel wire (the "dandy roll") into the damp mushy paper pulp, compressing or thinning it in the area the wire touches. The watermark can be a simple image as we see on the single Crown over A stamps on early Roo and KGV issues. Or they can be a far more "busy" design as we encounter on the Small Multiple and "C of A" designs.

Paper was supplied to the Australian Note Printer in large sheet form from the UK. KGV head stamps were printed 8 panes of 60 each pass - i.e. '480 on' and then guillotined down to the normal PO sheets of 120.

Wiggins Teape paper

The papermaker for this issue was Wiggins Teape in the UK, although issues like the 1934 Victoria Centenary also had Cowan supplied paper on the 2d value. The recent ACSC listings have separated these issues and some are quite valuable. Many dealers are NOT aware of this, and bargains abound!

Kellow tells me that the papermakers did not make the dandy roll for watermarks - that is a separate specialty manufacturing operation. The dandy roll would have been be supplied under authority to whichever papermaker was authorised to use them.

At some point a "C" broke or fell off the master grid, and was soldered on backwards in error. Seventy years have gone by and not one collector has ever noticed this - until now.

The new discovery

This discovery stamp is dated September 1935 as mentioned and was posted from "Koo-Wee-Rup" Victoria. I can't decipher either the name or date from photo, but Geoff Kellow assures me both are correct. I have seen a scan of the reverse, and the error looks indeed beyond question.

"C of A" watermarked stamps were first issued in 1931, and for the next 20 years every stamp printed were watermarked with this design. From the early 1950s onwards commemorative issues were unwatermarked, but all definitives were - even the humble ½d orange value, until 1959

Indeed all the pre-Decimal Navigator stamps on sale until the 1966 Decimal issues were on the same "C of A" watermarked paper, as were all printings of the 5/- 1961/64 Cattleman.
So we are talking literally BILLIONS of stamps sold on "C of A" watermarked paper.

The "C of A" stood for "Commonwealth Of Australia". Most British Empire stamps in this era had a fairly similar Multiple "CA" watermark, which of course stood for Crown Agents.

-End of Glen's article-

Feature Article The Australian Aborigine

By Harvey Terris. Moncton

Occasionally some countries have paid tribute to their indigenous people on postage stamps, but very few have named the individual chosen. One exception to this is Australia.

The 1950 series had a design for the 8 1/2p and 2sh6p values, prepared by Frank Manley, and was based upon a photograph by Ray Dustan. The engraving was done by E.R.M. Jones, recess printed on De la Rue paper.

The aborigine featured was a Central Australian native known as "One Pound Jimmy". He was so known because when asked how much he charged to perform a certain task, he invariably responded "One pound, boss".

His tribal name was Gwoya Jungarai, and he died on March 28, 1965, while on a walkabout with his relatives on Narweitooma Cattle Station, 120 miles west of Alice Springs. His exact age was not known, but he was believed to be over 70 years old when he died. He was not a particularly handsome individual, but he was certainly representative of his people, and his image will live in infinity.

The 8 1/2p (Scott no. 226) was printed on Watermark 15 paper, in dark brown, and perforated 15 x 14. The 2sh6p variety (Scott no. 248) was larger in size (21 x 25.5 mm) in the same dark brown colour, on watermark 15 sideways paper. Both were issued in 1964.

Supplies of the 2sh6p bird stamp ran out just before Christmas 1965, and as the photogravure press was in constant use preparing the new decimal series stamps, an emergency printing of two months supply (800,000 copies) of the 2sh6p Aborigine were prepared (Scott # 303).

Two old electros from 1952 had to be used. These showed the authority imprint as used for the wa- termarked version, and as this was overlooked the imprint now appears on unwatermarked paper. The sepia colour used is distinctly different from issue no. 248. The 1965 printing was on white Harrison paper, whereas the earlier watermarked issue was on toned paper.

1989 Sports Series I

Specialist notes and numbering system are from "The Australian Commonwealth Specialist Catalogue" (ACSC), 2002 Edition. Published by Brusden-White.

The Australian Commonwealth Specialist Catalogue divides the issue into two by the type of paper used.

No 1358
Harrison unwatermarked white paper incorporating helecon.
ACSC Description
1358 3c Aussie Football (0 koalas)
1358c Yellow and Chestnut omitted
1358d Green flaw on left footballer's leg On original and 1K reprint
1358x CTO (from Stamp Collecting Kit)
1358z Original Printing Block of four left side
1358za Original Printing Block of four right side
1358zb 3c Aussie Football reprint (1 koala) Left side April 1991
1358zc 3c Aussie Football reprint (1 koala) Right side April 1991
1358zd 3c Aussie Football reprint (4 koala) Left side December 1998
1358ze 3c Aussie Football reprint (4 koala) Right side December 1998
1402w Post Office Pack with 1c bowls, 2c tenpin bowling, 3c Football, 39c fishing, 55c kite, 70c cricket & $1.10 golf Front and Inside Pack

Two sets of Stamp Collector Cards were issued. Set Two included the 3c Football issue

No 1359 CPL unwatermarked white paper incorporating helecon.

ACSC Description
1359z 3c Aussie Football reprint (2 koala) Left side January 1995
1359za 3c Aussie Football reprint (2 koala) Right side January 1995
1359zb 3c Aussie Football reprint (3 koala) Left side September 1996
1359zc 3c Aussie Football reprint (3 koala) Right side September 1996

Technical Information

Date of Issue 13th February 1989
Design Geoff Cook, Melbourne
Printer Leigh-Mardon Pty Ltd, Melbourne (Moorabbin) for original, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Reprint. SNP Cambec 4th Reprint
Paper Harrison unwatermarked white Paper with helecon (Original & 1 Koala and 4 Koala), CPL unwatermarked white Paper with helecon (2 Koala and 3 koala)
Sheets Sheets of 100 in 10 rows of 10
Perforations 13.98 x 14.40
Printing Process Photolithography
Other Stamps In series 1c Bowls, 2c Tenpin Bowling, 39c Fishing, 55c Kite Flying, 70c Cricket, $1.10 Golf
Reprints (Koalas & Kangaroos)

During 1989 Australia Post decided to identify reprints by adding a koala symbol to the selvedge of sheets. The symbol was applied on each alternate row starting from the top of the sheet in both the right and left selvedge adjacent to the corner of the stamp. (see 1 koala reprint) In 1993 a decision was made to print the symbol on each row at both the left and right of the sheet. (see 2 koala reprint).

Successive reprints up to and including the fourth reprint will carry additional koalas. A kangaroo is shown for the fifth reprint and is positioned in the same way as the koalas. Additional reprints up to the eighth reprint will show the kangaroo with the appropriate number of koalas.
------------------------------------------------------------
Another Paper Type reference found

From Charles Leski's Auction Sept 12th 2006-09-16
To furthur prove that what I have stumbled on is not a fluke I found the following two lots offered at a recently closed auction of Charles Leski - now I am sure I am onto something, earlier I was discarding the bluish white Ultra Violet reaction as washed off-fluorescence.

5c - 30c Birds; complete sheets of 100 of each with gutters, from the Jan.1967 (and later) reprints.

All these sheets are on White Paper, with a bluish-white UV reaction on front, the normal reaction
being pale-pink. BW.Cat.$9450. [See BW.448a, 449a, 454a, 455a, 456a, 457a, 458a & 459a].

Remarkably scarce. Superb condition. (800).....................................................................................................$1,250 - $1,500

7c - 10c Fish; complete sheets of 100 of each with gutters, from the Jan.1967 (and later) reprints.
All these sheets are on White Paper, with a bluish-white UV reaction on front, the normal reaction
being pale-pink. BW.Cat.$1300. [See BW.450a - 453a]. Remarkably scarce. Superb condition. (400) ....................... $150 - $200
.
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
GlenStephens
I was online for Post Number 4 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 4 MILLION!
Posts: 21960
Joined: 06 Sep 2005 19:46
Location: Sunny Sydney .... well Castlecrag to be precise.
Contact:

Post by GlenStephens »

Very scholastic and I am of sure of great interest to many here.

The article of mine you quote from is here:

http://www.glenstephens.com/snnovember05.html
.
Click HERE to see superb, RARE and unusual stamps, at FIXED low nett prices, high rez photos, and NO buyer fees etc!

User avatar
gavin-h
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Posts: 33220
Joined: 01 Apr 2007 02:10
Location: West Coast of England

Post by gavin-h »

Great piece of work, Samcam, 8)

As a non-specialist in Oz stamps, I found it most useful to have all this info in one place. :)

User avatar
mrboggler
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 10425
Joined: 19 Apr 2007 11:56
Location: Croydon, Victoria

Post by mrboggler »

Great work.

and as a Dealer it is very useful to have this info in one spot for ref material.

keep it going,

Ron.
Nunawading Stamp Fair
Last Sunday of Every Month - Jaycees Hall Silver Grove - Nunawading.

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Post by samcam »

Hi all,

Thanks for the appreciation - all I did was to use some common sense and gather data from different sources and put it all in a new perspective.

There is a famous quote "If you take someone else's work and present it as your own it is called plagiarism but if you gather information from many different sources then it is called research".

Glenn I have the images in the original word document but I removed them as they were not relevant to the paper types. The useful note is at the bottom where you mentioned the paper type and supplier.

Now all I am looking for is names of Paper Suppliers, Paper Manufacturers and paper Manufacturing processes.....! A big ask but I know there are members here who may have such information lying buries somewhere in the philatelic related papers that we all tend to put on the top shelves :)

Any furthur research on the actual stamps is also welcome, living so far away I am woefully short of research material. Most of my flurescence tests are based on used singles do have a few mint copies of each in some cases but mostly it is the used singles.

The differences are so great that I can't relate them to transfer/absence of helecon or fluorescence during soaking or exposure to UV light. As it is I was only looking for paper difference and not the Helecon and Fluorescence/Phosphorescence/Luminescence differences.

Will appreciate if this project is taken up by Stampboard Members and push it as a Stampboard Project withour worrying about final outcome........maybe BW will take notice or ...

Saleem
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
kennywkt
Emerald Level Stampboards KNIGHTHOOD!
Emerald Level Stampboards KNIGHTHOOD!
Posts: 67874
Joined: 01 May 2007 15:47

Post by kennywkt »

Admire Work!

Image

User avatar
dwhopper
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1573
Joined: 14 Jun 2007 22:21
Location: Toronto, Canada

Post by dwhopper »

Have you included the wealth of data that Australia Post published in their Stamp Printing Technical Details books?

I know they are recent, but they are very detailed and list various and sundry paper and paper supplier details.

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Post by samcam »

I used to get the AusPost stamp program boklets until 2005 so I have the dtails of the newer issues but my research was only upto the Sports definitive series beyond that the self adhesives made it more difficult to continue.

But if the Stamp Printing Detail Books are something else wich I haven't yet seen or heard of than I would like to see the data in them - maybe it will relate to the older issues and provide some pointers.
Saleem
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
COLIN
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 2618
Joined: 14 Nov 2007 20:11
Location: Boksburg - South Africa

Post by COLIN »

Very interesting reading. Well done and thanks for sharing your research with us all.

Rgds

Colin
President - Edenvale Philatelic Society -South Africa
Vice President - Region 2 - Philatelic Federation of South Africa

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Post by samcam »

Thanks for the appreciation. In the past when I was probing around I received some good advice and remember one of them which sadly I couldn't follow up as I am far away from Australia.

Someone told me that there have been many dozens of articles on Australian paper variations in the Bulletin of the Australian Commonwealth Collectors of NSW. Also that I should contact them and become a member and ask for past copies of all the bulletins that mention paper variations.

I tried my best to get in touch with them through friends but was not successful. No that I am here at Stampboards with a number of members from NSW maybe some of them are members of the club and could get the relevant data for me :)
Saleem
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
dwhopper
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1573
Joined: 14 Jun 2007 22:21
Location: Toronto, Canada

Post by dwhopper »

This an example of what Australia Post has published.

User avatar
MarginBlocks
PLATINUM Star Serious Stamp Poster
PLATINUM Star Serious Stamp Poster
Posts: 423
Joined: 20 May 2007 02:03
Location: Milledgeville GA (the Antebellum capital 1804-1868)

Post by MarginBlocks »

Your extensive posting is being printed for my philatelic files so I can keep it and read it offline.

While the printer was grinding away, I went to check my own copy of Brusden-White decimal issues and lo and behold, I own a copy of the Elizabeth II pre-decimals, as well.

It looks like I have not been paying too much attention to my second largest specialized collection--Australia--for a few years!

Mark Alan
Coral Springs, FL USA

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Post by samcam »

Dear Dennis,
Thanks for the scans, the information in the booklet is excellent and worth spending money for. I will try and find out how many of these were issued and since when. I am especially looking for the period starting from KG VI till 1990. Maybe AusPost issued some of these during the early decimal era.

Hi Mark,
Good to hear that you are paying more attention to your Australian Specialized collection - maybe if you start with the first decimal definitives and work from there as time permits you will find some variations not listed anywhere.

I do have some dealers price list from Australia in which a lot of color, paper and die variations are listed. I am just editing my Excel lists to add the revelant data from these lists and from what I have gathered from the net so far. I will post the results here so everyone interested can check out their own data. Maybe my list will have the data which is already listed in BW catalogs but then again it may not be there. But I will appreciate any help in adding/removing/editing entries in the lists.
Don't know how to post Excel files here, maybe I will place it elsewhere and provide a link here.
Saleem

PS
Here is the first e-mail I exchanged with David Collyer last year on the subject, he wouldn't mind me sharing this with members of Stampboards, nothing came out of it as he was not able to meet the editor of BW at that time.

From: "Saleem" <samcam61>
To: <d_collyer30>
Subject: Paper used for early Australian Stamps
Date: Sun, 27 Aug 2006 11:09:29 +0530

Dear Sir,
I don't have access ot the prestigious Brusden White catalog of Australian Stamps and rely on other catalogs and dealer price lists for my Specialised Australian listings. I am intrigued by the paper used for early Australian issues. I am finding paper varieties way back to the 6d Kookaburra issue, I use a long wave Ultra Violet lamp which makes some stamp papers glow a lot brighter than others which are probably on cream paper. This fluorescence is found both on definitives and commemoratives, the varieties I'm finding are on white paper, cream paper (both non-fluo.) and white fluorescent paper and even there are some in this category which are a bit different like dull, low, medium and high fluorescence.

Could you please confirm when the Australian stamps started coming out on fluorescent paper? Not the Helecon paper varieties which are listed in other catalogs. I'm surprised by the varieties of most of the pre decimal issues of this era but due to the non availability of the BW catalog I'm unable to classify them or to have a complete listing of these. All I need is a confirmation of the issue from which Australian stamps started appearing on fluorescent paper, or maybe this is termed as chalk surfaced paper in the catalog.
Kind Regards
Saleem M Khan
India

From : David Collyer <d_collyer30>
Sent : Sunday, August 27, 2006 3:08 PM
To : samcam61@hotmail.com
Subject : RE: Paper used for early Australian Stamps

Dear Saleem,
Thank you for your enquiry. I have passed it onto the editorof the Brusden-White catalogue.
David Collyer
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
asvcat
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
Posts: 611
Joined: 13 May 2007 12:29
Location: Australia

Australia Post Stamp Printing Technical Details

Post by asvcat »

The last edition of the Australia Post Stamp Printing Technical Details (SPTD) book may be issued soon. It has been "in progress" for over a year.

I am in regular contact with the editor, Bryan Young. He is now over 85 and said the "January 2004 to June 2005" edition would be his last. He no longer can afford the time or cost to purchase all the Australia Post products. But AP asked him to write "just one more".

Bryan and I have compared notes and contributed to each others books. My Australian Stamp Variations catalogue contains much of the information in the SPTD book, except I do not mention paper in the same detail. (I only cover basic paper variations such as colour and thickness. As you can see, above, it is a very specialised area.) Details about image, size and integrated tabs variations and the recent reprints are not covered or are incorrect in the current SPTD book. Bryan has put corrections in the new edition.

With SEP Sprint no longer printing stamps I wonder what variations will be issued.

David

User avatar
amhazing
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1275
Joined: 14 Apr 2008 22:39
Location: Australian Capital Territory

Post by amhazing »

Thanks for this post all!!

Samcam - I have printed out you paper and added it to my library.

I also have a copy of the Aus post publication and will be getting a copy of the Aus variations cat soon. This was a great help!
Have a GREAT! Day
Amy :)

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Post by samcam »

I am glad that whatever data I have posted here is deemed useful. But it is not yet complete and need much more work to be done before the paper variations can be confirmed.

What I am looking for is a list/names/details of :
1- Paper Suppliers to Australia Post upto 1980s
2- Paper Manufacturers from whom stamp paper was purchased by suppliers during the same period (In some cases the manufacturer could be the supplier)
3- Printing processes used in the period for printing stamps.

Is there any record that was kept by AusPost for the above?

I need help from anybody who is interested in going furthur and sharing in this research otherwise like in 2006 this will soon be forgotten.

Just to share one more thing that I unearthed - in some decimal era definitives I have found that the paper mesh differs from horizontal to vertical, this maybe be because of how the sheet was fed to the printing machine but could also be due to the different manufacturing processes.

This to David -
I was thinking of getting the SPTD books but do the earlier editions cover the first decimal series or later issues upto 1980? Now that Bryan has decided not to write anymore of the SPTD books he may have some more time to concentrate on the earlier issues, maybe you can put the idea to him :)
Same thing about your Variations Catalog, I do need a copy for reference but first I want to search for the data which is relevant to Paper Type. The main thing hampering me is postage costs for all of my needs. You see the Aus Var. catalog will cost almost same as it's price to ship to India.
Once I bid on the 1987 version of BW for US $25 the postage costs to India were US $45 at that time but was thankfully outbid the next day.
I am thinking of asking Michael of CDD stamps to bring the publications for me next time he visits India, which he regularly does :wink:
Saleem
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
asvcat
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
Posts: 611
Joined: 13 May 2007 12:29
Location: Australia

SPTD books

Post by asvcat »

The first SPTD book covered January 1988 to June 1997. Corrections and updates were issued in subsequent editions. A special Supplement was issued in 1993 that also covered corrections for the above dates.

Bryan gets his info by buying Australia Post's products and examining them. I believe there are no records provided by Australia Post!

User avatar
Brummie
I was online for Post Number 4 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 4 MILLION!
Posts: 18312
Joined: 04 Jan 2009 00:02
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: AUSTRALIAN PAPER TYPES - A RESEARCH PAPER

Post by Brummie »

samcam this site might be useful for the printers details

http://www.stampprinters.info/SPI_Country_Australia.htm

User avatar
crosscrescent
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Posts: 39751
Joined: 03 Apr 2007 13:59
Location: Klang, Selangor, Malaysia

Re: AUSTRALIAN PAPER TYPES - A RESEARCH PAPER

Post by crosscrescent »

Samcam,

Great piece of research.
Keep it up.

Cheers
Andrew

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by samcam »

The candle was lighted some time back and the light spread - now I have got a few confirmations from collectors of Aussie stamps around the world that there were indeed different paper types used in different printings of early decimals and some earlier definitive stamps. Here is what I have received from two of the guys:

"Dear Saleem: I have read your article on Australia paper types and congratulate you. Your article spurred me to look into my Australian stamp inventory, and I found two interesting items. One is the 1992 Greetings stamp booklet. I found I had two different printings of the stamps. One was on an ordinary paper and the second a much lighter paper very obvious when comparing the two side by side. Also, one fluoresces under ultraviolet lamp and one doesn't. The second is the 30 cent 1986 Christmas stamp. I ordered them directly from the Australian Post and requested all varieties available and they send me three sheets of the 30 cent. One was the perforation change, and another was listed as "cream" paper. None of the catalogs that I have show a cream paper of this stamp.

And another recent one:
"Last night, I discovered that interspersed among my large accumulation of 1d green KGV heads were about 20-25 copies that fluoresce extremely brightly. There was nothing to indicate that this had resulted from contamination as the effect was consistent across all examples.
Unless these stamps were deliberately soaked in a detergent that contains an extremely powerful whitening agent, it seems that there was a particularly variety of paper that was used before the mid-1960s that was highly fluorescent.
It seems to have been used only on the 1d greens, however. None of my other KGVs (and I have thousands of the 2d orange, the 1 1/2 red, and the 2d red) show the same reaction.
It would, of course, be extremely unlikely that anyone who soaked their stamps in detergent would confine this activity to the 1d greens, so it seems to me that we are talking about a special paper variety here. I hope you find these observations helpful".


Let us hear from others who have experimented with UV lamps on their mint Australian stamps.
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
tascollector
GOLD Star Super Posting Stampboarder!
GOLD Star Super Posting Stampboarder!
Posts: 345
Joined: 27 Jan 2009 08:47
Location: Hobart, Tasmania

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by tascollector »

This is a very interesting area for research - thank you for putting the effort in to write your findings up.
As a KGVI collector, I have found Brusden White invaluable and there are plenty of listings for thin paper varieties, apart from the unsurfaced Robes issues. There are some scarce items and a micrometer would justify the purchase cost by virtue of identifying some of the thin papers that often go under the radar of many collectors.
BW lists thin paper at .086 mm, and says normal thickness is just over .1 mm whereas you are saying normal thickness is .09 mm, and thin is .075 ?

Given BW has already listed a lot of paper varieties perhaps you can save yourself some time by looking at whats already been recorded ?
I'll be keeping an eye on this topic and keep up the good work.

User avatar
Rein
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 3274
Joined: 03 Feb 2009 09:50
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rein »

Saleem,

we have met before on a US forum, but that was ages ago!

I am very deep into stamp paper types first of all for the Netherlands and Belgium, but since a few years also for Argentina...

http://www.galeoptix.nl/fila/druktech.htm

User avatar
Rein
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 3274
Joined: 03 Feb 2009 09:50
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rein »

Saleem,

in these studies I have showed a few new approaches to stamp paper research!

Weaving techniques and watermarks:

http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=14068

Argentina pre 1935:

http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=11512

Argentina 1935-1951:

http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=6550&start=1050

Argentina post 1951:

http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=11377

Mexico:

http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=22507

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by samcam »

Some excellent work on your main site "Postage Stamp production methods" but may links are broken :( I wanted to read the 'Paper' link and the Australia Stamp paper link but they are not working. The dual language write-up is excellent but at one place I got only the Dutch language. These are small matters which you can correct in a jiffy - I would certainly love to read the above two pages. Have added your website to my favourites :o
Have read the discussions here at Stampboards but as they were not featuring Australian Stamp paper types it was a once read over. Is it possible to post your Australian paper type notes here in this discussion?

I distinctly remember meeting you in the past probably at Greg Deeter's forum but couldn't recall the subject we discussed! I am sure it was philatelic :)
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
samcam
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1530
Joined: 04 Mar 2008 18:43
Location: Bhopal, India

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by samcam »

Hi tascollector,
Good to hear your comments, first let me clear the thickness confusion - the conversion from imperial to metric system when rounded off doesn't perfectly give the results when it is in thousand parts. Measuring 0.086 mm and 0.075mm thickness is easier in imperial set micrometers, in my post above I have given both the measurements.
I do have Brusden White catalog thanks to a member of Stampboards who offered it to me just for postage at the time I was doing this research (Thanks again :P).
I have checked BW before proceeding on this paper types search whatever is listed I have taken that into account and saved myself from re-inventing the wheel. The varieties that I have found and which have been discovered by other Australian collectors over the world can not be ignored and the catalog taken as the final word. Catalogs are constantly updated by philatelic findings of collectors so if anything out of ordinary is discovered there is no harm in pursuing the matter furthur - I did that and have heard from collectors who have also discovered something similar.
Always drink upstream from the herd.

User avatar
tascollector
GOLD Star Super Posting Stampboarder!
GOLD Star Super Posting Stampboarder!
Posts: 345
Joined: 27 Jan 2009 08:47
Location: Hobart, Tasmania

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by tascollector »

Thanks for clearing that up. I am sure you re right about their being more varieties than listed in the BW catalogue ( good as it is...). I am aware of many flaws on some of the Tasmanian Pictorial stamps that are genuine but not listed, for instance. I would think that paper varieties would be a fertile field to explore for the KGVI issues as you would imaging not much work has been done in this area by collectors. Perhaps at some stage BW might be interested in seeing a list of new paper varieties with a view to up-dating their listing should they ever reprint their cataloge.
If you can ever persuade anyone to get into the Commonwealth Archives you might be able to find the Post Office Paper order records - but its a lot of work for someone and I live in the wrong State, unfortunately.
Keep up the good work!

User avatar
Lakatoi 4
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Posts: 21752
Joined: 19 Apr 2007 20:41
Location: First star on the right then straight on till morning ...

Re:

Post by Lakatoi 4 »

samcam wrote: Someone told me that there have been many dozens of articles on Australian paper variations in the Bulletin of the Australian Commonwealth Collectors of NSW. Also that I should contact them and become a member and ask for past copies of all the bulletins that mention paper variations.

I tried my best to get in touch with them through friends but was not successful.

Saleem
Saleem, here are all the details for the ACCC (address is at the bottom of the page):

http://www.philas.org.au/accc/index.html
Tony
"A cancelled stamp tells part of the story, a cover tells it all"

User avatar
Rein
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 3274
Joined: 03 Feb 2009 09:50
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rein »

samcam wrote:Some excellent work on your main site "Postage Stamp production methods" but may links are broken :( I wanted to read the 'Paper' link and the Australia Stamp paper link but they are not working. The dual language write-up is excellent but at one place I got only the Dutch language. These are small matters which you can correct in a jiffy - I would certainly love to read the above two pages. Have added your website to my favourites :o
Have read the discussions here at Stampboards but as they were not featuring Australian Stamp paper types it was a once read over. Is it possible to post your Australian paper type notes here in this discussion?

I distinctly remember meeting you in the past probably at Greg Deeter's forum but couldn't recall the subject we discussed! I am sure it was philatelic :)
Saleem,

a few aspects like felt side or wire side printed, symmetrical vs asymmetrical paper mesh had not been taken into account by paper historians in philately so far!!

I am sure the Australian collectors have overlooked these aspects as well...

User avatar
Rein
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 3274
Joined: 03 Feb 2009 09:50
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rein »

Saleem,

I recently did some posting in

http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=43913&p=3235539#p3235539

Perhaps I should continue here!?

Hoping you wil read this in a good condition!

Rein

User avatar
Rein
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 3274
Joined: 03 Feb 2009 09:50
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rein »

Stamp papers for Australian stamps probably must be divided into several groups due to the type of printing methods.

Sheet-fed printing in typography and recess before 1934; reel-fed recess printing on the Hoe rotary 1934-197?; reel-fed photogravure on the Chambon-press 1962-197?; and the later offset-litho printings....

Before 1934 ALL stamp paper had a symmetrical mesh [paper wire structure] and densities of more or less 30/20. Occasionally a 24/22 density could be expected!

For the Hoe period, however, we have at least 5 types of paper!

- symmetrical wire structure 30/20
- symmetrical wire structure 24/22
- asymmetrical wire structure 30/20
- asymmetrical wire structure 30/20 - no watermark
- symmetrical wire structure 30/20 - no watermark


to be continued ....

User avatar
Rob1956
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1190
Joined: 19 Dec 2013 02:37
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rob1956 »

A wealth of information about paper types, thanks.
Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW. Member ACCC of NSW

User avatar
tapstamp
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 136
Joined: 10 Jul 2007 12:15
Location: Mildura, Victoria, Australia

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by tapstamp »

Good Morning All, A helpful reference to the study of stamp paper may be found in the work carried out by the late Dr. Charles .G.S. Hosking. in 1996.

Charles was a medico Dr. who had a passion for stamp collecting. He gained a Degree of "Master of Engineering Science in Pulp and Paper Technology"

He published his thesis in 1996 titled " Examination of the Ink and Paper of the Commonwealth of Australia Postage Stamp King George V . One Penny Red." in the Department of Chemical Engineering ,Monash University, Melbourne Australia.

I feel sure that the book could be referenced through the University library.
Regards Tom
Ageing stamp collector

User avatar
Rob1956
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1190
Joined: 19 Dec 2013 02:37
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rob1956 »

Thanks Tom for the info, will look for the book at the library when I go there in the next few days.
Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW. Member ACCC of NSW

User avatar
jet195801
AQUA Star Stampboards Enthusiast
AQUA Star Stampboards Enthusiast
Posts: 42
Joined: 08 May 2014 00:51
Location: Numurkah, Australia

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by jet195801 »

As a newer member I would just like to express my gratitude to the author of the Post: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper. As a very inexperienced collector I found the information extremely helpful and will bookmark it for future reference - thank you, Geoff. :D

User avatar
PlentyGaps
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Posts: 95
Joined: 31 Jan 2015 14:24
Location: Hallett Cove, S.Aust

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by PlentyGaps »

samcam wrote:GEORGE VI Issues on Thin Paper
The stamps of this reign were printed as before by the Note Printing Branch of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. All new issues were rotary recess-printed.

There is some variation in the thickness of the paper used for these issues. following measurements are of unused stamps with full gum, the measurement being taken over the printed stamp, not over blank selvedge. Stamps on ordinary watermarked paper average about .09 mm in thickness (.0035 inches) For those who wish to collect thin paper varieties, a watermarked stamp gauging less than .08 mm (.0031 inches) may be classed as thin.

Stamps on unwatermarked paper average about .085 mm (.0033 inches). The unwatermarked thin paper variety should gauge less than .075 mm (.0030 inches). For stamps without gum the above measurements should be decreased by about .004 mm (.0002 inches).
I understand this also applies to some issues in QEII era. The easiest way to distinguish them before measuring is to turn them over!

This scan is an attempt to show that the design of what I believe to be ASCS 296a clearly shows through the back of the stamp. The Thin paper is on left, thicker paper on right for comparison.

Being a used stamp, it has no extra value over the much more common thicker paper according to my edition of ACSC.

Now I know this is an extremely common stamp, but surely the thin paper variety must have a cat value of at least a couple dollars?

Image
Malcolm - My collection has more gaps than a five year old's smile.

User avatar
Rein
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 3274
Joined: 03 Feb 2009 09:50
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rein »

Image

Both stamps seem to have an asymmetrical wire structure [twill binding] but with different densities which I can not establish as the scan is not clear enough....

User avatar
PlentyGaps
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Posts: 95
Joined: 31 Jan 2015 14:24
Location: Hallett Cove, S.Aust

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by PlentyGaps »

Hello Rein

Am I correct in understanding that, by looking at the twill structure, you do not think that one of the stamps I have shown is a thin paper variety?

Before I continue, let me say quite clearly that I am absolutely a rank amateur who has only been guided up to now by the notes in ACSC - and these do not mention twill structure! So please be patient with me!

I have gone back and read your earlier comments (hopefully with a bit more understanding).
Rein wrote:Stamp papers for Australian stamps probably must be divided into several groups due to the type of printing methods.

Sheet-fed printing in typography and recess before 1934; reel-fed recess printing on the Hoe rotary 1934-197?; reel-fed photogravure on the Chambon-press 1962-197?; and the later offset-litho printings....

Before 1934 ALL stamp paper had a symmetrical mesh [paper wire structure] and densities of more or less 30/20. Occasionally a 24/22 density could be expected!

For the Hoe period, however, we have at least 5 types of paper!

- symmetrical wire structure 30/20
- symmetrical wire structure 24/22
- asymmetrical wire structure 30/20
- asymmetrical wire structure 30/20 - no watermark
- symmetrical wire structure 30/20 - no watermark


to be continued ....
Question: Am I correct in deducing that the symmetrical wire structure 24/22 would be "thin" and all the 30/20 varieties "thick"?

I also have a pair of KGVI stamps that I have kept (believing them to be "thin paper" varieties).

I would be interested in your assessment as to twill structure on these.

Should I re-scan any of them at 1200dpi?

Image
Malcolm - My collection has more gaps than a five year old's smile.

User avatar
Rein
Sadly departed RIP. Greatly missed here
Sadly departed RIP.  Greatly missed here
Posts: 3274
Joined: 03 Feb 2009 09:50
Location: Leiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Rein »

Malcolm,

it is hard to tell from these images. The 24/22 density is rather a symmetrical wire structure...

The stamps depicted by me on July, 4th, were all asymmetrical...

Rein

User avatar
PlentyGaps
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Posts: 95
Joined: 31 Jan 2015 14:24
Location: Hallett Cove, S.Aust

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by PlentyGaps »

Hi Rein

Is this scan better?

I'm trying to see what you see but am not there yet.

Image
Malcolm - My collection has more gaps than a five year old's smile.

User avatar
Madstars
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 242
Joined: 18 Mar 2014 20:24
Location: Canberra, Australia

Re: Australian Paper Types - A Research Paper

Post by Madstars »

Great thread, thank you

Post Reply

Return to “Discuss stamps - and *anything* at ALL happening with stamps”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], tweety1117 and 5 guests