What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

We all have and handle these from time to time. "Back of book", Revenues, "Cinderellas", duty stamps and all kinds of other stamp like labels. Discuss them all HERE!

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Panterra
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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by Panterra »

kelpiefarm wrote:Moving on to Sharjah, . . .

I cannot seem to find these exact ones online, but I am guessing they are 1967-ish?


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A great online listing of all the stamps of Sharjah (and the other Trucial States) can be found here:
https://www.ohmygosh.on.ca/stamps/sharjah/sharjah.htm

Enjoy!

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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by Panterra »

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Sharjah 1963 the first definitive set, showing the "evil" Sheikh Saqr. SG 1 - 21.
This quite attractive set was Sharjah Post Office's first appearance in the catalogues under its own name, but its stamps soon became a byword for over-indulgence, and Gibbons decided to introduce their "Appendix" to cope with the many sets that they considered "issued in excess of postal needs or have not been made available to the public in reasonable quantities at face value".

That description of course would describe the majority of the new issues of many lands today!

The stamps all show the ruler, Sheikh Saqr, and a map of the UAE highlighting the areas ruled by Sharjah. Sheikh Saqr was soon to be deposed by the British.

An elusive set today, with a high catalogue value.

Wikipedia wrote:Saqr bin Sultan Al Qasimi was the Ruler of Sharjah from May 1951 to 24 June 1965.

Saqr was the eldest son of Sultan bin Saqr Al Qasimi II, who ruled 1924-51. After Sultan's death, Saqr became the ruler. Saqr was an Arab nationalist, which undermined the British Empire's control of the Trucial States. In 1964, he supported the opening of an Arab League office in Sharjah, after a visit by an Arab League delegation lead by Abdul Khalek Hassouna, the Secretary-General at the time. The British viewed this move as a threat, which lead the British administration to intervene and initiate the ouster of Saqr as the ruler Sharjah. In 1965, Glencairn Paul, the British Political Agent in Dubai, was tasked to inform Saqr of his deposition. Saqr was then exiled to Bahrain and eventually Cairo. His cousin, Khalid bin Mohammed Al Qasimi succeeded him.

On 24 January 1972, following soon after the creation of the United Arab Emirates on 2 December 1971, Saqr returned to Sharjah from Egypt with a number of mercenaries and seized power in an attempted coup. The group invested the Ruler's palace at approximately 2.30 pm, with reports of gunfire and grenade explosions within the palace. Besieged by the Union Defence Force, which arrived an hour later, Saqr finally gave himself up in the early hours of 25 January to UAE Minister of Defence, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum. However, Khalid was killed in the action.

Saqr died in 1993, aged 69.
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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by Panterra »

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Sharjah 1965 Overthrow of the "evil" Sheikh Saqr. SG 150 - 161.
This set was Sharjah Post Office's attempt to cope with the British-organised coup that deposed the evil Saqr, and enabled them to not have to waste the vast mountains of definitive stamps showing his face.


Please note that these have three bars obiliterating the hated portrait.
Wikipedia wrote:Saqr bin Sultan Al Qasimi was the Ruler of Sharjah from May 1951 to 24 June 1965.

Saqr was the eldest son of Sultan bin Saqr Al Qasimi II, who ruled 1924-51. After Sultan's death, Saqr became the ruler. Saqr was an Arab nationalist, which undermined the British Empire's control of the Trucial States. In 1964, he supported the opening of an Arab League office in Sharjah, after a visit by an Arab League delegation led by Abdul Khalek Hassouna, the Secretary-General at the time. The British viewed this move as a threat, which lead the British administration to intervene and initiate the ouster of Saqr as the ruler Sharjah. In 1965, Glencairn Paul, the British Political Agent in Dubai, was tasked to inform Saqr of his deposition. Saqr was then exiled to Bahrain and eventually Cairo. His cousin, Khalid bin Mohammed Al Qasimi succeeded him.

On 24 January 1972, following soon after the creation of the United Arab Emirates on 2 December 1971, Saqr returned to Sharjah from Egypt with a number of mercenaries and seized power in an attempted coup. The group invested the Ruler's palace at approximately 2.30 pm, with reports of gunfire and grenade explosions within the palace. Besieged by the Union Defence Force, which arrived an hour later, Saqr finally gave himself up in the early hours of 25 January to UAE Minister of Defence, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum. However, Khalid was killed in the action.

Saqr died in 1993, aged 69.
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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by Panterra »

Continuing the saga of the evil Sheikh Saqr on stamps:
Image
Sharjah 1966 New currency surcharges.
Overthrow of the "evil" Sheikh Saqr stamps,
with surcharges in Dhiram and Riyals.
SG mentioned but unlisted.
This set was Sharjah Post Office's attempt to cope with the vast mountains of definitive stamps available when the currency was changed. The "fish" definitive and various other sets were also surcharged, though Gibbons only gives recognition status to the Fish surcharges. The other overprints (like this set) are clearly considered too "fishy."


Wikipedia wrote:Until 1966, Qatar used the Indian rupee as its currency, in the form of Gulf rupees. When India devalued the rupee in 1966, Qatar, along with the other states using the Gulf rupee, chose to introduce its own currency.

Before doing so, Qatar briefly adopted the Saudi riyal, then introduced the Qatar and Dubai riyal following the signing of the Qatar-Dubai Currency Agreement on 21 March 1966. The Saudi riyal was worth 1.065 Gulf rupees, whilst the Qatar and Dubai riyal was equal to the Gulf rupee prior to its devaluation.

Following Dubai's entry into the United Arab Emirates, Qatar began issuing the Qatari riyal separate from Dubai on 19 May 1973. The old notes continued to circulate in parallel for 90 days, at which time they were withdrawn.
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Sharjah's stamps (the Gibbons-listed ones at least).

Post by Panterra »

Continuing the saga of the evil Sheikh Saqr on stamps:
Image
Sharjah 1965 Overthrow of the "evil" Sheikh Saqr pictorial stamps,
with bars obliterating the hated face.
SG 144 - 149.
This set was Sharjah Post Office's attempt to cope with the vast mountains of stamps available when the coup threw out Sheikh Saqr. The pictorials show Sharjah to be a pleasant country to live in, with castles, forts, and verdant oasis. Every snow-bound philatelist's dream!

Wikipedia wrote:Khor Fakkan (10 n.p. stamp) is a city and exclave of the Emirate of Sharjah, located on the east coast of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), facing the Gulf of Oman, and geographically surrounded by the Emirate of Fujairah. The city, the second largest on the east coast after Fujairah City, is set on the picturesque bay of Khor Fakkan, which means "Creek of Two Jaws". It is the site of Khor Fakkan Container Terminal, the only natural deep-sea port in the region and one of the major container ports in the UAE.

The Portuguese built a fort at Khor Fakkan that was a ruin by 1666. The log book of the Dutch vessel the Meerkat mentions this fort and another one, describing "Gorfacan" as a place on a small bay, with about 200 small houses built from date branches, near the beach. It refers to a triangular Portuguese fortress on the northern side, in ruins, and a fortress on a hill on the southern side, also in ruins, without garrison or artillery. As well as date palms, the Meerkat's log also mentions fig trees, melons, watermelons and myrrh. It notes several wells with "good and fresh water" used for irrigation.

One reason suggested for the ruinous state of the forts is an invasion in 1623 of the Persian navy under the control of Omani Sheikh Muhammad Suhari. Suhari, facing a Portuguese counter-attack, withdrew to the Portuguese forts, including that of Khorfakkan. When the Persians were expelled, the Portuguese commander Rui Freire urged the people of Khorfakkan to remain loyal to the Portuguese crown and established a Portuguese customs office as well.

In 1737, long after the Portuguese had been expelled from Arabia, the Persians again invaded Khor Fakkan, with some 5,000 men and 1,580 horses, with the help of the Dutch, during their intervention in the Omani civil war. In 1765 Khor Fakkan belonged to a sheikh of the Al Qasimi, Sharjah's ruling family, according to the German traveler Carsten Niebuhr. There is a map by the French cartographer Rigobert Bonne dating to about 1770 that shows the Arabian Peninsula and the Persian Gulf and includes Khor Fakkan.

At the turn of the 19th century, Lorimer notes that Khor Fakkan had about 5,000 date trees and was home to about 150 houses of Naqbiyin and Arabicised Persians, amounting to some 800 souls. The population lived by cultivation and pearling and the town had seven shops.

The German submarine U-533 sank about 40 km off the coast on 16 October 1943 during World War II. Divers found the wreck at a depth of 108 metres in 2009.
More interestingly for philatelists, Khor Fakkan was a stamp-issuing entity for several years prior to the establishment of the UAE. Sharjah stamps were often overprinted for Khor Fakkan, and sometimes, distinct issues were printed.
Image
Khor Fakkan 1966 Beautiful roses.

Most of Khor Fakkan's stamps were carefully targeted at topical collectors.
But with oil bringing in millions, who needs stamp sales now?
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Sharjah 1970 Fifth anniversary of Sheikh Khalid's accession.

One of the few stamps showing Khalid, who was unfortunately murdered the following year by the evil Saqr during his attempted coup.
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Re: Sharjah's stamps (the Gibbons-listed ones at least).

Post by Panterra »

Continuing the saga of the evil Sheikh Saqr on stamps:
Image
Sharjah 1965 Overthrow of the "evil" Sheikh Saqr pictorial stamps,
with FOUR bars obliterating the hated face.
Originally listed as SG 133 - 143, but now no longer listed.
This set was Sharjah Post Office's attempt to cope with the vast mountains of stamps available when the coup threw out Sheikh Saqr. Note the second version of the 50 n.p. stamp, with MUCH wider bars than those on the other stamps.

Gibbons originally listed these stamps as numbers 133 to 143, but seem to have delisted them in the latest version of their catalogue, for unknown reasons. They were catalogued quite high when they did have "catalogue status."

Compare these with the later overprints (shown above), which have just three bars, much bolder, to more adequately expunge the hated visage.


Wikipedia wrote:Sharjah is the third largest and third most populous city in the United Arab Emirates, forming part of the Dubai-Sharjah-Ajman metropolitan area. It is located along the southern coast of the Persian Gulf on the Arabian Peninsula.

Sharjah is the capital of the emirate of the same name. Sharjah shares legal, political, military and economic functions with the other emirates of the UAE within a federal framework, although each emirate has jurisdiction over some functions such as civil law enforcement and provision and upkeep of local facilities. Sharjah has been ruled by the Al Qasimi dynasty since the 18th century.

The city is a centre for culture and industry, and alone contributes 7.4% of the GDP of the United Arab Emirates. The city covers an approximate area of 235 sq km and has a population of over 800,000 (2008). The sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited in the emirate of Sharjah without possession of an alcohol licence and alcohol is not served in Sharjah hotels, restaurants or other outlets due to the Muslim majority in the area. This has helped Sharjah increase the number of Islamic tourists who visit the country. Sharjah has been officially named as a WHO healthy city. The 2016 edition of QS Best Student Cities ranked Sharjah as the 68th best city in the world to be a university student. Sharjah is regarded as the cultural capital of the UAE, and was the Islamic culture capital in 2014. Sharjah was named World Book Capital for 2019 by UNESCO.
The evil Sheikh Saqr in happier times:
Image
Sharjah 1964 New York World's Fair, imperf minisheet.

Note that this stamp appears to be a mere bi-colour (black and light blue), but if you look carefully, below Saqr's chest, one of the rays of the spotlight is definitely pink, and another appears green, thus proving that these sheets were printed via a full-colour process, and not just a two-colour as one may otherwise have thought.
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Re: Sharjah's stamps (the Gibbons-listed ones at least).

Post by Panterra »

Continuing the saga of the evil Sheikh Saqr on stamps:
Image
Sharjah 1966 Official overprints, again showing the "evil" Sheikh Saqr, and issued AFTER his overthrow.
Wonder why the face was not obliterated on this set? Perhaps they were prepared during his rule and not issued till later?
This set was Sharjah Post Office's coping with the need for special stamps for government ministries.

SG O1 - O10.

There is also a 8 n.p. value, which is sadly missing from my collection.


Wikipedia wrote:Sharjah is the third largest and third most populous city in the United Arab Emirates, forming part of the Dubai-Sharjah-Ajman metropolitan area. It is located along the southern coast of the Persian Gulf on the Arabian Peninsula.

Sharjah is the capital of the emirate of the same name. Sharjah shares legal, political, military and economic functions with the other emirates of the UAE within a federal framework, although each emirate has jurisdiction over some functions such as civil law enforcement and provision and upkeep of local facilities. Sharjah has been ruled by the Al Qasimi dynasty since the 18th century.

The city is a centre for culture and industry, and alone contributes 7.4% of the GDP of the United Arab Emirates. The city covers an approximate area of 235 sq km and has a population of over 800,000 (2008). The sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited in the emirate of Sharjah without possession of an alcohol licence and alcohol is not served in Sharjah hotels, restaurants or other outlets due to the Muslim majority in the area. This has helped Sharjah increase the number of Islamic tourists who visit the country. Sharjah has been officially named as a WHO healthy city. The 2016 edition of QS Best Student Cities ranked Sharjah as the 68th best city in the world to be a university student. Sharjah is regarded as the cultural capital of the UAE, and was the Islamic culture capital in 2014. Sharjah was named World Book Capital for 2019 by UNESCO.
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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by warm »

I personally would like to get bulk of the Zaire inflationary stamps of the ~1990s which are considered as wallpaper.

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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by Panterra »

warm wrote:I personally would like to get bulk of the Zaire inflationary stamps of the ~1990s which are considered as wallpaper.
But there are no (or few) sand dunes in Zaire, so surely this remark is in the wrong thread? :oops:

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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by agondocz »

Hi,

A cover from Qatar that went through the Bahrain Post Office:
Image
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The airmail cover to Chicago was postmarked on 28 JUN 1947. Please note that the Indian government was still responsible for Bahrain's postal administration.

The one rupee and two annas KGVI Indian stamps overprinted "Bahrain" were used to pay the airmail rate.

Articles include:
  • Jones, T.E.: "Qatar" in Arabian Gulf States Postal History and Stamps Quarterly, Summer 2003, Edition 12, pp 22 - 23. Description, discussion and image of what may be one of the first Qatar covers found. The cover was mailed from Bahrain with a P. D. Qatar Ltd. return address.

    Johansen, T.: Correspondence and covers about the use of Bahrain stamps in Qatar in Arabian Gulf States Postal History and Stamps Quarterly, Summer 2008, Edition 27, pp 31 - 34

    Johansen, T.: "Early mail via Bahrain with Qatar origin" in Arabian Gulf States Postal History and Stamps Quarterly, Spring 2009, Edition 30, p. 27. The cover is dated 30 November 1938.
Best wishes,
AndrewG

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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by agondocz »

Although philatelic, the cover was not mailed by the Ajman post office:
Image
Image
The Ajman cover was addressed to Fujeira and postmarked on 25 JAN 1972. The was franked with three Eisenhower stamps: a 30dh with Pope John XXIII, a 70dh with Chancellor Adenauer and a 5rl with then Vice President Nixon.

The Fujeira backstamp is dated 29 1 72.

I would only be guessing at the rate. Any help appreciated.

Best wishes,
AndrewG

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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by aerogi »

A "normal" stamp from Sharjah
DSC_1074.JPG

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Re: What do you do with "Sand Dunes" type stamps?

Post by a6zsn »

agondocz wrote:
09 May 2020 08:29
Although philatelic, the cover was not mailed by the Ajman post office:
Image
Image
The Ajman cover was addressed to Fujeira and postmarked on 25 JAN 1972. The was franked with three Eisenhower stamps: a 30dh with Pope John XXIII, a 70dh with Chancellor Adenauer and a 5rl with then Vice President Nixon.

The Fujeira backstamp is dated 29 1 72.

I would only be guessing at the rate. Any help appreciated.

Best wishes,
AndrewG
Dear Andrew,

I will personally guess that it is a fabricated cover!

During the last era of Ajman postal administration, only stamps that are bearing the name of "Ajman State and Its Dependencies" were officially used since September 1st, 1971. Also, during the same period, a new type of cancellations are introduced in Ajman post office. The correct rate during Gulf & Emirates during this period was 20dh.

Best wishes,
Khalid

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