Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Stampboards has 1000s of regular readers who WILL take the time to help out even with the most basic question. If you are new to stamps - or taking up the hobby after a long break, there is a lot to learn. PLEASE do not be shy in asking the simplest of questions .. members here will be delighted to help you with the answers!

Moderator: Volunteer Moderator Team

Post Reply
User avatar
Number-O-Ne
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 680
Joined: 13 Oct 2020 10:21
Location: Loveland, Ohio, USA

Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Post by Number-O-Ne »

Hello,

I would like to request help in understanding what happened to this cover after leaving Italy, Italian Social Republic to be accurate.


Help with German Language Marking and Swiss Label on 1945 Cover from Italy to Switzerland through Germany

Mailed from Bolzano (Bozen) in Italian Social Republic. After passing German censorship in Munich, it was sent to Switzerland. Bolzano was under German occupation.

It was the major administrative center of the German Operationszone Alpenvorland (OZAV). Absence of Italian censor is not unusual.

Was taken directly by Germans and added in German mail.

My questions are:


1-The nature of this German language marking:


Scan 3.jpeg

Was it used in Germany or Switzerland?


2- The purpose of this label:
Scan 2.jpeg
I see no change of recipient address. Was it a censorship or a regular clearance label?

3- Was express service provided at the destination, or were the express stamps (two horizontal stamps on the left) just a waste of money?

Thanks so much to everybody


Scan.jpeg

Scan 4.jpeg


User avatar
jwk
I was online for our Birthday Number 3!
I was online for our Birthday Number 3!
Posts: 330
Joined: 22 Mar 2010 07:13
Location: Netherlands

Re: Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Post by jwk »

1) + 2) "304" is the Swiss censor (located in Bern)
It was then stamped "Zuzustellen Feldpostdirektion " (Deliver to adressee, Fieldpost Headquarters), and
handed over to the civil postal service for delivery (= Orange label in the three Swiss languages: German/French
/Italian)

3) Don't know I'm afraid

See for more info the article in the Helvetia Philatelic Society Newsletter (a PDF file, article is on the second page)
http://swiss-philately.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/HNL-2008-11.pdf

User avatar
Number-O-Ne
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 680
Joined: 13 Oct 2020 10:21
Location: Loveland, Ohio, USA

Re: Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Post by Number-O-Ne »

jwk wrote:
18 Jun 2021 23:27
1) + 2) "304" is the Swiss censor (located in Bern)
It was then stamped "Zuzustellen Feldpostdirektion " (Deliver to adressee, Fieldpost Headquarters), and
handed over to the civil postal service for delivery (= Orange label in the three Swiss languages: German/French
/Italian)

3) Don't know I'm afraid

See for more info the article in the Helvetia Philatelic Society Newsletter (a PDF file, article is on the second page)
http://swiss-philately.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/HNL-2008-11.pdf
Thanks so much for the answer and the article.

:)

User avatar
Phila-Tourist
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 121
Joined: 19 Feb 2021 05:58
Location: Europe

Re: Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Post by Phila-Tourist »

In many countries it was or is not prohibited to use express stamps (or airmail stamps) on ordinary (or surface mail) letters. The stamps alone would not indicate a special service. There would need to be instructional labels or stamps (as in rubber stamps) to that effect.

In most European countries in the past 50 to 100 years express letters have been marked with prominent red labels, particularly international letters. Up to the 1970s and 1980s, express letters would also have transit postmarks from multiple locations on their back, not only one from the receiving postmark of the final destination. Lastly, in Europe up the the 1970s it was customary for senders to point out special services in manuscript on their envelopes ("registered", "express") even though this was not required because the post office would apply official markings stating the same.

So my guess is the cover was not sent express, and was not intended to.

User avatar
Number-O-Ne
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 680
Joined: 13 Oct 2020 10:21
Location: Loveland, Ohio, USA

Re: Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Post by Number-O-Ne »

Phila-Tourist wrote:
20 Jun 2021 08:56
In many countries it was or is not prohibited to use express stamps (or airmail stamps) on ordinary (or surface mail) letters. The stamps alone would not indicate a special service. There would need to be instructional labels or stamps (as in rubber stamps) to that effect.

In most European countries in the past 50 to 100 years express letters have been marked with prominent red labels, particularly international letters. Up to the 1970s and 1980s, express letters would also have transit postmarks from multiple locations on their back, not only one from the receiving postmark of the final destination. Lastly, in Europe up the the 1970s it was customary for senders to point out special services in manuscript on their envelopes ("registered", "express") even though this was not required because the post office would apply official markings stating the same.

So my guess is the cover was not sent express, and was not intended to.
Thanks so much, Phila-Tourist

I believe this letter was sent express on purpose. According to Italian postal rules, use of a dedicated express stamp, like the green horizontal stamps on my cover, did not require a separate express label.

Only when the express fee was paid with ordinary stamps was a specific indication about express service required. The request could be made with a label or in handwritten form.

Analysis of the fee on this cover: 1.25L letter + 1.50L registration + 2.50L express with special stamps = 5.25 Lire.

Italian postal rules allowed express mail to foreign countries. The only case express service was explicitly prohibited was when the recipient was military personnel in combat. On the other hand, there was no promise the receiving country would honor the express delivery request.

I believe the express delivery was requested by the sender on the Italian side, but looks like the service was not provided on the Swiss side.

User avatar
Phila-Tourist
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 121
Joined: 19 Feb 2021 05:58
Location: Europe

Re: Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Post by Phila-Tourist »

Number-O-Ne wrote:
20 Jun 2021 09:11
but looks like the service was not provided on the Swiss side.
That seems likely. I sometimes feel that postal workers 70 years ago were far more professional and knowledgeable than their successors today! Nonetheless, an Italian express postage stamp (not even red in colour!) as the only indication of a service paid and requested might have been just too easily overlooked or ignored.

User avatar
Number-O-Ne
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 680
Joined: 13 Oct 2020 10:21
Location: Loveland, Ohio, USA

Re: Help with German Marking & Swiss Label 1945 Cover Italy-Switz

Post by Number-O-Ne »

Phila-Tourist wrote:
20 Jun 2021 09:27

Nonetheless, an Italian express postage stamp (not even red in colour!) as the only indication of a service paid and requested might have been just too easily overlooked or ignored.
Kingdom of Italy had dedicated international express stamps. Some had visible French "Express" written on those, and some were in different colors.

Italian Social Republic is my exclusive area of interest. It was a German puppet state and did not care much about international postal relations except for finding ways to limit the correspondence as much as possible :?
.

Post Reply

Return to “NO question is too basic or silly - you ask - we WILL help you with it!”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Allanswood and 1 guest