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Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 30 Jul 2020 02:54
by 60022Mallard
Cill Dara wrote:
30 Jul 2020 01:41


Part of the EU €2 Trillion (yes Trillion) Budget agreed last week includes a €5 Billion Brexit mitigation fund.
It also allows for the issuing of EU Soverign Bonds and the mutualisation of debt, a groundbreaking advance.
Remind me when the electorate of Holland, Germany and others voted to directly to subsidise highly indebted countries.

Are the Germans actually going to join in, or will that annoying court there, which does not accept ECJ supremacy, veto it?

An alternative view of your "ground breaking advance" is that it is the rock at the bottom of the existing hole that has already been dug to keep the Euro going to make the hole even deeper!

Congratulations on your election on here to be the one to talk to the aliens.

https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=91557

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 30 Jul 2020 03:18
by Cill Dara
You're despicable, Daffy[/size]....... :lol: :lol: :lol:

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 30 Jul 2020 03:30
by 22028
60022Mallard wrote:
30 Jul 2020 02:54
Are the Germans actually going to join in, or will that annoying court there, which does not accept ECJ supremacy, veto it?
I hope our annyoung court stands to his ruling. As long as we have no common TAX (incl coorporate Tax)-System, Pension-System, Migration laws, i am firmly against any ECJ supremacy.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 31 Jul 2020 23:11
by Cill Dara
Brexit: Giant lorry park branded 'concrete monstrosity'

Work on an "emergency lorry park" in Kent to accommodate up to 10,000 vehicles bound for Europe began without the knowledge of residents.

The government recently acquired the 27-acre site near Ashford and there are fears it will be used to contain thousands of lorries waiting to travel to continental Europe and for border-related checks.


https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-kent-53568309

Brexit LIVE: Huge blow hits Japan trade deal as Tokyo demands UK makes MAJOR compromise

https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1316244/brexit-news- ... eal-brexit


Brexit - the gift that keeps on giving. 8-)

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 31 Jul 2020 23:15
by Ubobo.R.O.
Sounds and reads more like preparing for the future to me.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 03 Aug 2020 15:44
by collectordave
Now I am confused!

Taking a break from my stamps and just read this from the guardian on line about a covid chart.

Scientists from the MRC Biostatistics Unit at Cambridge University have warned that it is "very likely" that most regions in England are close to the point at which the virus begins to spread exponentially.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has warned: "Clearly we now face, I'm afraid, the threat of a second wave in other parts of Europe and we just have to be vigilant."

Mr Johnson seems a little confused, hopefully he does realise that England is not in "other parts Of Europe" but is actually part of the UK!

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 03 Aug 2020 19:21
by Cill Dara
british-isles-map.gif

I'm amazed at how often BBC and Sky News refer to the "British Isles", as above.

Ireland left in 1922 and Northern (East) Ireland is in the departure lounge. :mrgreen:

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 00:54
by gavin-h
Cill Dara wrote:
03 Aug 2020 19:21
I'm amazed at how often BBC and Sky News refer to the "British Isles", as above.
In a geographical sense, they are correct to do so. Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles.

In this context, "Great" is simply the geographical term for the largest island in the group, not a delusion or pretention of grandeur.

In the same context, Ireland is the second-largest of the British Isles.

No political point to be made here, just a geographical fact.

Historically Ptolemy referred to the larger island as great Britain (μεγάλη Βρεττανία megale Brettania) and to Ireland as little Britain (μικρὰ Βρεττανία mikra Brettania), so this dates back at least to Roman times.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 02:31
by faro
And for more geographical clarification (just because...)
collectordave wrote:
03 Aug 2020 15:44
...
Prime Minister Boris Johnson has warned: "Clearly we now face, I'm afraid, the threat of a second wave in other parts of Europe and we just have to be vigilant."

Mr Johnson seems a little confused, hopefully he does realise that England is not in "other parts Of Europe" but is actually part of the UK!

The UK is still part of Europe but no longer in the EU.

(For completion's sake, the Channel Isles and Isle of Man are in Europe but were never in the EU).

Boris is, I presume, just stating that there is the threat of a "second wave" in "other parts of Europe"; i.e. outside the UK. And England is also, of course, not the UK... (That's more usually a problem from the US-perspective)

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 11:08
by Waffle

Cill Dara's post about NorthEast Ireland being in the departure lounge is at best, wishfull thinking. Over the dead bodies of 60% of it's residents or has he forgotten democratic will.

Perhaps he has also forgotten The Ulster Covenant of 1912, still relevant to most of the 60%. For the record, I am in favour of a united Ireland as the hard working people of Northern Ireland would run the show.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 12:03
by Global Administrator
Waffle wrote:
04 Aug 2020 11:08
I am in favour of a united Ireland as the hard working people of Northern Ireland would run the show.

Huh?

That would be like us merging with New Zealand (as will likely occur in my lifetime) and them expecting to run things, surely?

Junior partners stay ................. junior partners.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 12:25
by Waffle

Glen, with the relative work ethics in Australia and NZ, a NZ take over or at least becoming the dominant factor, in the event of Australia becoming West Island,(contemplate Bondi), is not an impossibility!

It is nice to know that you do keep an eye on what some green members think and write.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 19:18
by Cill Dara
Waffle wrote:
04 Aug 2020 11:08

Cill Dara's post about NorthEast Ireland being in the departure lounge is at best, wishfull thinking. Over the dead bodies of 60% of it's residents or has he forgotten democratic will.

Perhaps he has also forgotten The Ulster Covenant of 1912, still relevant to most of the 60%. For the record, I am in favour of a united Ireland as the hard working people of Northern Ireland would run the show.
Industrial output in Ireland.

1922 - 80% in "The North" & 20% in "The South".

2020 - 20% in "The North" & 80% in "The South".


Election 2019 news may not have reached Waffleland - Nationalists 9 MPs & Unionists 8 MPs. :mrgreen:

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 21:00
by Cill Dara
The percentage of people in Northern Ireland who would vote for a united Ireland is almost as high as the number of those who would vote to remain the UK, according to a new poll.

The LucidTalk poll, which was commissioned by The Detail, looked at how Brexit has impacted the view of Northern Ireland's constitutional future.

It showed 46.8% in Northern Ireland would vote to remain in the UK, while 45.4% would vote for a united Ireland. 7.8% said they would unsure how they would vote.


https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/nor ... 89093.html


Brexit...........tick, tock. 8-)

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 21:41
by Global Administrator
Cill Dara wrote:
04 Aug 2020 19:18

Industrial output in Ireland.

1922 - 80% in "The North" & 20% in "The South".

2020 - 20% in "The North" & 80% in "The South".

That is no surprise as the Brits have been ''running'' things up North! (Translated - drop-kicking boatloads of money across the ditch to prop it up. Like Tahiti or St. Pierre et Miquelon or New Caledonia etc, as their "other' beloved neighbours do.) :D

All they have there is the Titanic Museum, a few buildings with large murals of that Bobby Sands MP etc, that somehow got elected to the UK Parliament, yet at the same time dying of starvation in the British Prison in Belfast. (Brits in panic changed the electoral rules immediately afterwards) and those funny rocks up in the North.

And they do not even drink Guinness, so not sure if the Southerners would really accept them back?? :lol:

But offer them a few 1000 Euros, and they might accept. With Brexit .. every Euro counts - heavens knows Brussels are sending them no more!

They'd save a fortune printing those silly banknotes that no-one on the mainland in "GREAT" Britain wants or accepts!



Trying finding anyone in GB that will accept this Monopoly Money - even Travelex at Heathrow refused to swap it for me.
Trying finding anyone in GB that will accept this Monopoly Money - even Travelex at Heathrow refused to swap it for me.
.
Let's play CAPTION THIS ----  Rasputin's Brother hunting for fleas?
Let's play CAPTION THIS ---- Rasputin's Brother hunting for fleas?

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 04 Aug 2020 23:32
by gavin-h
Cill Dara wrote:
04 Aug 2020 19:18
Election 2019 news may not have reached Waffleland - Nationalists 9 MPs & Unionists 8 MPs. :mrgreen:
Doesn't seem to have reached Cill Dara Land either - the 7 Sinn Féin ("Nationalist") MPs will not take up their seats at Westminster.

As we are discussing this I would like to take a moment to remember John Hume, whose the death was announced yesterday. John Hume was a true and honourable Nationalist politician. Although as a (Conservative and) Unionist, I disagree with much that he, he always acted in the interests of the people he represented and managed to do that without showboating and without violence of actions or words so common in (North Eastern) Irish politics. RIP John Hume

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 05 Aug 2020 00:05
by Cill Dara
Global Administrator wrote:
04 Aug 2020 21:41

But offer them a few 1000 Euros, and they might accept. With Brexit .. every Euro counts - heavens knows Brussels are sending them no more!

They'd save a fortune printing those silly banknotes that no-one on the mainland in "GREAT" Britain wants or accepts!



Image[/centre]

As a matter of interest, the EU will continue to provide funds for projects in Northern (East) Ireland until at least 2027.

That guy on the banknote is John Dunlop, inventor of the pnuematic tyre (tire for Yanks).

Joke - 8-)

Yank tourist visits tartan shop in Edinburgh.
Yank asks for clan McIntyre tartan (actually it's an Irish name).
Och surrie, we are clean out of them, advises shopkeeper,....how about a Dunlop tartan?
I said McIntyre shouts Yank.
Shopkeeper keeps straight face........Och Dunlops have ben McIntyres for years.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 05 Aug 2020 00:16
by Global Administrator
Cill Dara wrote:
05 Aug 2020 00:05

That guy on the banknote is John Dunlop, inventor of the pneumatic tyre (tire for Yanks).

No big deal - the Romans had wood and steel carriage wheels for 3000 years!

Maybe he is picking out ear wax for the purpose?

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 05 Aug 2020 00:16
by Cill Dara
gavin-h wrote:
04 Aug 2020 23:32
Cill Dara wrote:
04 Aug 2020 19:18
Election 2019 news may not have reached Waffleland - Nationalists 9 MPs & Unionists 8 MPs. :mrgreen:
Doesn't seem to have reached Cill Dara Land either - the 7 Sinn Féin ("Nationalist") MPs will not take up their seats at Westminster.
Earth calling trainee politician......9 is greater than 8......Westminister is irrelevant to Irish Nationalists.


Hume.jpg
This John Hume?

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 07 Aug 2020 00:25
by Cill Dara
Breaking news, sort of..........Unnamed Tory MP arrested for being allegedly very very naughty, in his 50s and former Minister.

Why post on the Brexit thread?

Wink, wink........... ;) :mrgreen:

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 07 Aug 2020 22:52
by Cill Dara
Roy Quinoa
@RoyQuinoa

Aug 3
54 year old ex-minister #MarkFranc(ois) is so opposed to the Euro that he changed his name by deed poll to commemorate two defunct currencies as a protest.



Seen on Politics forum........deserves a giggle. :lol:

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 07 Aug 2020 23:27
by Cill Dara
Gove announces £650m Brexit support package for the North
Funding includes £355m to assist traders and £300m to support peace projects


The funding comprises £300 million of support for the European Union’s Peace Plus programme and £355 million to assist traders in the North deal with the complications of Brexit.

Of the £355 million the package involves £200 million towards a new free-to-use Trader Support Service that will assist with import, safety and security declarations on behalf of traders.

The other £155 million, according to Mr Gove’s office, will fund the development of new technology to ensure the new processes can be fully digital and streamlined.


https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/gove-announces-650m ... -1.4324507

Mike Gove visits Belfast today with a Brexit package........nothing to do with a border in the Irish Sea, completing EU paperwork or to match EU funding for Northern Ireland. 8-) :mrgreen:

Brexit means Brexit.......Get Brexit Done.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 07 Aug 2020 23:33
by 22028
Just noted that one stamp dealer has now moved to Ireland, apparently ahead of Brexit. He knows where the priorities are...

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 08 Aug 2020 04:21
by norvic
22028 wrote:
07 Aug 2020 23:33
Just noted that one stamp dealer has now moved to Ireland, apparently ahead of Brexit. He knows where the priorities are...
Come on, you can't just leave it like that. Who, and from where and to where.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 08 Aug 2020 04:48
by ViccyVFU
22028 wrote:
07 Aug 2020 23:33
Just noted that one stamp dealer has now moved to Ireland, apparently ahead of Brexit. He knows where the priorities are...
You don't say if he moved to North or South, but one dealer isn't big news, even on a very quiet day.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 08 Aug 2020 05:52
by Cill Dara
One stamp dealer, lots of British based Banks and Insurers requiring EU Passporting......and now.....


TikTok has said it plans to build a $500m (£375m) data centre in Ireland.

It will store videos, messages and other data generated by European users from the short-form video-sharing app.

Until now all of its users' records were stored in the US, with a back-up copy held in Singapore.


The decision to base it in Ireland does not, however, mean London is out of the running to host the app's global HQ.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-53664997


You can bet that the IDA is busy persuading Tik Tok to also set up HQ in Dublin.....they already have a Dublin base...

Brexitland is off the Chinese menu. :mrgreen:

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 08 Aug 2020 16:44
by Waffle
Kildare could well be Tik-Tok's next HQ, God forbid.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 08 Aug 2020 20:12
by Cill Dara
Waffle wrote:
08 Aug 2020 16:44
Kildare could well be Tik-Tok's next HQ, God forbid.
Why not, we already have Intel in Cill Dara, employing over 6,000, more to come. 8-)

Intel's new €3.6 billion manufacturing plant in Leixlip gets green light


The planning permission follows three years on after Intel secured planning permission for the first phase of the ‘fab’ facility valued at $4 billion.

In total, the two planning permissions represent a $8 billion (€7.26 billion) investment which will employ 6,000 construction workers at peak and 1,600 full-time jobs on completion.

Consultants for Intel told Kildare Co Council that the firm has already invested $12.5 billion on its site at Leixlip.



Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 08 Aug 2020 21:50
by Cill Dara
The Conservative whips’ office has been aware of concerns relating to the alleged behaviour of the MP arrested last weekend on suspicion of rape dating back to 2010, The Times understands.

Multiple sources claimed that ministers had to intervene to “manage” his conduct in 2016 and 2019. Present and former parliamentary workers claimed that he had also allegedly been involved in inappropriate behaviour at a party conference. They claim he was considered to be erratic in his dealings with colleagues, crass and quick to anger.


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/whips-knew-of-concerns-ab ... -5vm7ndsc9


Concern has been raised about the absence of xxxx xxxxxxxx MP from his Twitter & Facebook accounts for the past week. Followers have expressed interest in obtaining his views on the above matter.

Why post on the Brexit thread? ;)

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 09 Aug 2020 13:23
by Brit-Col
Cill Dara wrote:
08 Aug 2020 20:12
The planning permission follows three years on after Intel secured planning permission for the first phase of the ‘fab’ facility valued at $4 billion.

For those of us not familiar with the local nomenclature what pray tell is a “planning permission”?

Is it what we here in the US call a “building permit”?

Just hadn’t come across that term before.

BC

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 16 Sep 2020 16:26
by collectordave
Seems like Boris is now breaking the withdrawal agreement with a new bill.

Is that not taking us back to where we were four years ago?

It seems to be the wrong direction.

Has he come up with a new idea to solve the issue of the Good Friday agreement or is he just looking to blame the EU for closing the border as a last ditch mud slinging effort?

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 16 Sep 2020 23:51
by OldDuffer1
Although I voted for Brexit I now have little faith, if a "No Deal" ensues, that this Govt. will be able to successfully put in the right systems, given the current fiascoes over Covid. Start stocking up now!

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 17 Sep 2020 01:54
by OldDuffer1
Sorry- repeat!

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 17 Sep 2020 09:09
by Ubobo.R.O.
That's OK OldDuffer1. I would imagine that Brexit would give a lot of people wind.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 18 Sep 2020 10:07
by Waffle
If, as seems increasingly likely, things go pear shaped,it may put wind in the sails of Boris's opponents.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 18 Sep 2020 11:33
by satsuma
Brit-Col wrote:
09 Aug 2020 13:23
Cill Dara wrote:
08 Aug 2020 20:12
The planning permission follows three years on after Intel secured planning permission for the first phase of the ‘fab’ facility valued at $4 billion.

For those of us not familiar with the local nomenclature what pray tell is a “planning permission”?

Is it what we here in the US call a “building permit”?

Just hadn’t come across that term before.

BC


Planning permission is used in NZ quite differently to building permit.

To get planning permission the agency concerned considers such things as environmental impact, traffic flow, scale of works, any expected departures from existing limitations on height, heritage values etc etc.

You don't need to get it if your project is a permitted activity for the area, and is considered non-notifiable, that is neighbours have no reasonable grounds to object.

A building permit means the authority concerned has considered the specific plans for the building and considers they meet all the building regulations or that waivers are appropriate.

So if you wanted to start mining or a chemical plant you would need planning permission before your proposed buildings were beyond the draft concept.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 18 Sep 2020 21:09
by OldDuffer1
collectordave wrote:
16 Sep 2020 16:26
Seems like Boris is now breaking the withdrawal agreement with a new bill.

Is that not taking us back to where we were four years ago?

It seems to be the wrong direction.

Has he come up with a new idea to solve the issue of the Good Friday agreement or is he just looking to blame the EU for closing the border as a last ditch mud slinging effort?
I think another analysis is that if "No Deal" is the result we cannot have the EU deciding what we can and can't move across the border with N.Ireland which is part of the United Kingdom. These clauses would, in any case, only come into effect if the "No Deal" scenario plays out. The EU is terrified, of course, that should this happen they would be forced to put a border between the Irish Republic and N.Ireland when, presumably, all hell would break loose! I have seen on several occasions representatives of the EU administration being asked about this- they always avoid the question!

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 20 Sep 2020 14:19
by collectordave
While the UK was a member of the EU the good Friday agreement worked. Free trade, free movement etc.

The UK has decided of its own accord to leave the EU, the UK has not been ejected.

It is now the responsibility of the UK to provide a scenario of how their border will be controlled. The agreement that the UK is attempting to break was simply the minimum acceptable on both sides for trade negotiations to start and was amendable at any time after leaving if the UK came up with better ideas

In breaking that agreement the UK has effectively stopped all trade negotiations.

After watching the EU news and reading their papers over the last few years the EU is not 'Terrified' of putting up a border, the word needed is somewhere between bemused and horrified that a national government, such as the UK, would flout its international agreements.

It is the UK that is terrified of being seen to be responsible for putting up a border, but instead of facing up to their responsibilities they appear to have decided to engage in some playground politics so they can put up their hands and say 'it wasn't me Miss'.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 24 Sep 2020 18:03
by honza
Ahoj!

The UK newspapers, (including the Brexit ones like Boris's Daily Telegraph , so it must be true) are reporting this morning on Government plans to require lorries to have special documents to enter Kent after Brexit comes into force on 31st December to stop congestion around the Cross-Channel ports.

Meanwhile I have been warned to expect my healthcare provision in the Czech Republic to terminate on the same date. Such are the benefits of Brexit :roll:

Stay safe especially in the UK,

You are in good hands,

Honza

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 25 Sep 2020 01:23
by collectordave
????

Does that mean there is going to be a border round Kent? I thought Kent was in the UK!

To stop congestion? Did the UK government not realise they might need a few more customs officers as they have to check every lorry before it boards?

Surely there will only be the same number of lorries crossing the channel as normal at that time of year, or are they expecting a mass migration of lorry drivers to the EU.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 25 Sep 2020 01:49
by collectordave
Ahh! all is well.

Just for a moment there I thought the UK had made a mess of things.

Just been told it is the hauliers fault as they have not got themselves prepared by obtaining the 'special paper work'.

The paperwork has not yet been designed by the UK government as they are waiting for the trade talks (stalled by the UK government) to conclude so they know what has to be in the paperwork.

Of course it will have to go out to all their importers as well so if you want anything from foreign parts such as Brown sauce, tomato ketchup, bacon or mayonnaise to name a few things get buying now and beat the delays while you wait for the government to design the paperwork.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 26 Sep 2020 20:33
by sebjarod
honza wrote:
24 Sep 2020 18:03
Meanwhile I have been warned to expect my healthcare provision in the Czech Republic to terminate on the same date. Such are the benefits of Brexit :roll:
It would be interesting to see how results of future local elections evolved in French villages and countryside where British - former E.U. - citizens were able to vote.

I remember many press articles that show British inhabitants could be very active in these local communities, especially in Périgord.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 06 Oct 2020 03:42
by Cill Dara
NI Assembly passes motion rejecting Internal Market Bill

The North’s Assembly has passed a motion rejecting the UK government’s Internal Market Bill and any claim it is necessary to protect the Belfast Agreement.

The Internal Market Bill, which is making its way through the UK House of Commons, threatens to override parts of the Northern Ireland protocol, the part of the Brexit withdrawal agreement designed to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland. The UK government has claimed the Bill is necessary to protect peace in the North.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/ni-assemb ... -1.4361833

Perfidious Albion at play.........real time.

Re: Political Consequences of Britain's BREXIT Referendum, 2016

Posted: 06 Oct 2020 20:09
by Cill Dara
Rosslare port in talks for new daily direct ferry service to continental Europe
Port says road hauliers want a frequent service to avoid landbridge congestion in Britain post-Brexit


Rosslare Europort is in advanced talks with a shipping company to start a direct ferry service to continental Europe for hauliers looking to avoid any post-Brexit congestion on the UK landbridge.

The southeast port, the closest Irish port to mainland Europe, is in discussions with a new shipping line to start a six-days-a-week service before the transition period ends on December 31st.

These calls have intensified with warnings from the UK government that there could be delays of two days with queues of 7,000 lorries in Dover in a scenario where the EU and UK fail to agree a trade agreement to reduce border checks once the transition period ends.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/rosslare- ... -1.4372750


I'm sure that French Fishermen will be on hand to welcome the Dover to Calais boats, in the usual fashion, not forgetting the fun that French Customs will have with sloppy British paperwork.

Boris forgets that there are two sides to a border. :mrgreen: