2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Discussion of anything you like. Sport, stamps, politics, religion, weather, world disasters, news articles - whatever. Things generally NOT stamp related belong in here. Please keep it CIVIL and polite though! We encourage lively discussion on all things.

Moderators: gmoney, Volunteer Moderator Team

User avatar
fchd
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 1161
Joined: 02 Dec 2015 08:45
Location: St Columb, UK
Contact:

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by fchd »

GB 789 wrote:
07 Aug 2021 08:22
Yes even more impressive for GB if you factor in that we were pretty awful in the rowing this year too. Usually we get 3-4 golds in those events yet only got 1 medal this time so hopefully in Paris we should perform well again.

Not bad for a ‘broken’ nation with a ‘losing mentality’!
I saw a stat somewhere saying that GB got more "Top 4" positions in rowing this time around than in Rio despite qualifying two fewer boats. Of course, most of those were 4th places but it just goes to show the small margins where 3rd is "a medal" and shows on the table and possibly a fraction of a second in 4th is nowhere.

User avatar
GB 789
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
Posts: 619
Joined: 28 Oct 2015 02:50
Location: Worcester, England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by GB 789 »

fchd wrote:
07 Aug 2021 08:28
GB 789 wrote:
07 Aug 2021 08:22
Yes even more impressive for GB if you factor in that we were pretty awful in the rowing this year too. Usually we get 3-4 golds in those events yet only got 1 medal this time so hopefully in Paris we should perform well again.

Not bad for a ‘broken’ nation with a ‘losing mentality’!
I saw a stat somewhere saying that GB got more "Top 4" positions in rowing this time around than in Rio despite qualifying two fewer boats. Of course, most of those were 4th places but it just goes to show the small margins where 3rd is "a medal" and shows on the table and possibly a fraction of a second in 4th is nowhere.
Yes those margins are so fine, literally millimetres! Like today’s 4x100m relay that we got pipped to hold by 0.01 seconds. Crazy!

User avatar
Rigs
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1128
Joined: 10 Apr 2019 15:51
Location: Port Macquarie, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Rigs »

Can someone please contact the Tokyo Olympic committee - there’s a misprint in the medal tally. GB now ahead of Australia in the gold medal ranks :o

User avatar
AMark
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 13781
Joined: 01 Jul 2010 05:39
Location: Canada

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by AMark »

Canada has currently reached a total of 22 medals for Summer Olympics. :) The athletes have tied their best results from Rio and Atlanta. I am very proud of all the Canadian athletes! :)
It does pay if you are humble and kind.
Cover Exchange Celebrating 10th Anniversary!
October 2021 Cover Exchange Participant List ..... OR .... October 2021 Postcard Exchange Participant List

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

CURRENT MEDAL TALLY.

2021-08-07_101038.jpg
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
gavin-h
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Posts: 33367
Joined: 01 Apr 2007 02:10
Location: West Coast of England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by gavin-h »

GB leading the way in the Sitting Down Olympics. :shock:

If it involves sitting in a boat, on a horse or on a bike, WE LEAD THE WAY. :mrgreen:

It’s only when we have to get up off our ar5es that we struggle. :lol: :lol: :lol:

User avatar
fchd
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 1161
Joined: 02 Dec 2015 08:45
Location: St Columb, UK
Contact:

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by fchd »

With Joe Choong emulating Kate French by taking Modern Pentathlon gold, it is (according to Gracenote) the first time GB have won the same event, other than a cycling event, in both men's and women's categories since 1964.

63 medals for GB so far (20-21-22) with one more guaranteed (in boxing) and a couple of decent chances in the remaining cycling events, it's not inconceivable we could improve on the tally from London 2012!

A far cry from Atlanta 1996 when we only won 15 medals, with the improvements starting in 2000/4 when we went to 28/30, then in Beijing 2008 up to 51.

If we do get hardware in both cycling events, it would make GB the first nation to gather 100 cycling medals.

User avatar
GB 789
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
Posts: 619
Joined: 28 Oct 2015 02:50
Location: Worcester, England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by GB 789 »

Yes a strong performance in these games under the circumstances. Paris 2024 will be very interesting as we should be even stronger then. Top 3 should be in sight then.

It will be very interesting to see if France perform better too then in a ‘home’ games as they should really be doing better than their showing in Japan.

At least the Birmingham Commonwealth Games next year give the Oz folk chance to regain their pride and take first place in the medals table as we have to compete as separate nations then 😊

User avatar
sagi2917
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1385
Joined: 23 Dec 2019 01:40
Location: Pune, India

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by sagi2917 »

Global Administrator wrote:
06 Aug 2021 04:00

India as always gobsmacks me it fares so poorly. Typically one or zero Golds per games for that gigantic population seems really impossible to believe.

Mathematically you MUST have a stunning runner, swimmer, wrestler, diver, cyclist, high jumper, boxer, rower, shot put thrower etc, etc, among a BILLION plus people.

A shame CRICKET does not get an entry at the Games. Then Australia would of course get another Gold, India a Silver, and several other countries would battle out for the Bronze. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Modi has really whipped up nationalism and belief and forward thinking there, so rather strange. We were all over the country 18 months back and vast advances in infrastructure and technology everywhere.

Indian Athletes have been offered MASSIVE sums for medal wins but nothing is happening there despite it. Weird. Not sure how much a CRORE of Rupees is, but it is a sh!tload. :D
1 Crore Rupees is approx. US $135k

We did get a gold today, albeit our first in athletics in the entire history

Population is not directly proportional to sports because parents especially in cities care more for education than sports, cricket maybe an exception. Infrastructure and financial support aspects are still areas of concern

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

CURRENT MEDAL TALLY.

2021-08-08_093856.jpg
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

WHAT THE SEVENTEEN AUSTRALIAN GOLD MEDALLISTS STAMPS LOOK LIKE.

1dd.jpg

I will starting a giveaway competition tomorrow. A set of these stamps will be the prize.
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
fchd
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 1161
Joined: 02 Dec 2015 08:45
Location: St Columb, UK
Contact:

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by fchd »

If GB excel at "sitting down" sports, AUS excel at those in the water. Only 2 of the 17 golds came from events on dry land, both in new events.

To have a tally of 17 gold and only 7 silver shows how well the Aussies converted their chances when it counted.

User avatar
sagi2917
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1385
Joined: 23 Dec 2019 01:40
Location: Pune, India

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by sagi2917 »

Ubobo.R.O. wrote:
08 Aug 2021 20:21
WHAT THE SEVENTEEN AUSTRALIAN GOLD MEDALLISTS STAMPS LOOK LIKE.

Image

I will starting a giveaway competition tomorrow. A set of these stamps will be the prize.
Looks nice. Had suggested similar stamps to IndiaPost too though not for gold alone but all 7 medal winners. Except for an acknowledgment received already I don’t expect anything else though a surprise issue will be great

User avatar
gavin-h
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Posts: 33367
Joined: 01 Apr 2007 02:10
Location: West Coast of England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by gavin-h »

sagi2917 wrote:
09 Aug 2021 00:15
Had suggested similar stamps to IndiaPost too though not for gold alone but all 7 medal winners. Except for an acknowledgment received already I don’t expect anything else though a surprise issue will be great
It's a great idea! As well as celebrating the achievements of your great athletes, it would encourage many more Indian people to try and emulate those efforts and build on a great start. :idea:

The value of publicity in sport is great, and the more positive things people see the more they want to emulate that. What young person wouldn't want to go the the Olympics and strive to win a gold medal? 8-)

User avatar
emason
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 1667
Joined: 30 Nov 2015 08:37
Location: North Yorkshire, England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by emason »

Global Administrator wrote:
06 Aug 2021 02:30
For the UK Olympic brass it certainy is. Pretty huge FAIL grade. You have about half as many Golds as you had in 2016.

Australia has over double.

A total UK disaster compared to Rio 2016.
That was a bit premature considering the fat lady hadn't yet sung. :mrgreen:
BBC wrote: That puts Britain on 65 medals - equalling their performance as hosts nine years ago and making Tokyo their second-most successful overseas Olympics after Rio 2016.

They claimed 22 golds, 21 silvers and 22 bronze medals in Japan.

Britain won 67 medals at the Rio Games - finishing second in the medal table - and UK Sport had set a medal target range of between 45 and 70 medals for these delayed Olympics.
. . . . .
Simon Gleave, head of sports analysis at Nielsen Gracenote, said: "At Rio 2016, Great Britain became the first country to improve on its medal tally in the Olympics after being the host - and Team GB have now become the first to equal or win more medals at each of the next two Games."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/olympics/58125822

Just think what GB could have achieved if it didn't have a "losing mentality".
Best wishes,
Bill

User avatar
AMark
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 13781
Joined: 01 Jul 2010 05:39
Location: Canada

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by AMark »

Congratulations to all of our members and their respective countries competing at the Tokyo Olympics! :)

All of the athletes (winning or not) do deserve our applaud and respect for their dedication and passion to the sport that they have chosen to pursue.

Thank you Olympians!
It does pay if you are humble and kind.
Cover Exchange Celebrating 10th Anniversary!
October 2021 Cover Exchange Participant List ..... OR .... October 2021 Postcard Exchange Participant List

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

FINAL TOKYO OLYMPICS MEDAL TALLY.

2021-08-09_110329.jpg

My Tokyo Olympics giveaway has now commenced. See here:

https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=96172
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
Rigs
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1128
Joined: 10 Apr 2019 15:51
Location: Port Macquarie, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Rigs »

emason wrote:
09 Aug 2021 03:50
Global Administrator wrote:
06 Aug 2021 02:30
For the UK Olympic brass it certainy is. Pretty huge FAIL grade. You have about half as many Golds as you had in 2016.

Australia has over double.

A total UK disaster compared to Rio 2016.
That was a bit premature considering the fat lady hadn't yet sung. :mrgreen:
BBC wrote: That puts Britain on 65 medals - equalling their performance as hosts nine years ago and making Tokyo their second-most successful overseas Olympics after Rio 2016.

They claimed 22 golds, 21 silvers and 22 bronze medals in Japan.

Britain won 67 medals at the Rio Games - finishing second in the medal table - and UK Sport had set a medal target range of between 45 and 70 medals for these delayed Olympics.
. . . . .
Simon Gleave, head of sports analysis at Nielsen Gracenote, said: "At Rio 2016, Great Britain became the first country to improve on its medal tally in the Olympics after being the host - and Team GB have now become the first to equal or win more medals at each of the next two Games."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/olympics/58125822

Just think what GB could have achieved if it didn't have a "losing mentality".
.
Yes, let's think about that. ;)

At the same time, though, let's also think about the per capita analysis of gold medal distribution, for which Team GB are well down the list. A lot of countries punching well above their weight (and good to see Australia's 7th state right up there at No.3)
.
Gold Medal Per Capita.jpg
:
.

User avatar
Global Administrator
The Sheriff
The Sheriff
Posts: 64921
Joined: 18 Apr 2007 22:57
Location: Tombstone
Contact:

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Global Administrator »

.
That per capita list is really a far more accurate measure, and shows that USA and China, and those should have been totally banned drug cheats Russia, do not rate well at all really.

Clearly, some countries like the USA and China have the mechanics and budget to field athletes in near all events, clearly expanding their medal win chances, so it by no means is a level playing field.

A super talented athlete from a small country is always possible to Gold Medal, and that does skew it somewhat with 1 or 2, or even 3 Gold winners. And now and again, a small country is very dominant in one sport - such as Cuba with Boxing. There should be no reason for this, but they always do well! :lol:

But for smallish population countries to get multiple medals, over multiple events, and multiple athletes, it gets far more meaningful.

New Zealand arguably did best this Games, although 3 of those 7 Gold were won by one person.

Other than that, it is clear Australia, Hungary, and Netherlands punched miles above their weight over the wide span of events. And Norway surprised me too. :mrgreen:

Glen
.
Click HERE to see superb, RARE and unusual stamps, at FIXED low nett prices, high rez photos, and NO buyer fees etc!

User avatar
GB 789
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
Posts: 619
Joined: 28 Oct 2015 02:50
Location: Worcester, England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by GB 789 »

If you compare the Olympic budgets of the USA and China with Britain’s, it is still an exceptional achievement that consistently we have been able to challenge their dominance. Coming second in Rio was a phenomenal national achievement.

Compared to 25 years ago in Atalanta when we won 1 gold medal, compared to now, I don’t think there has been a bigger success story in recent years, certainly not a ‘failure’.

The best thing about it all though is from 2000 we pretty much copied Australia’s model for Olympic success, except we took it one step further and became even more successful. Sharing is caring so thank you Australia 😊

User avatar
Panterra
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 2264
Joined: 28 Feb 2012 21:54
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Panterra »

It's great to see the attractive stamps by Australia Post, celebrating the gold medal winners.

And on sunny Waikoa Island also, they have done a nice stamp celebrating their one gold medal winner!

You no doubt saw the spectacular finish on your television, when keen young athlete Henrietta Oboe-Menshevik, defeated the Bolshevik Olympic Committee to take the gold in Women's Competitive Philately.

Her photo on the stamp shows her at the finish, and you can clearly see the protective gloves to ensure that no stamps were harmed during the fierce bout.


Image
Waikoa Island 2021 Olympic Gold Medal winner.


Unlike the Bolshevik Olympic Committee, she had NO drugs in her system (apart from a bit of overdose of "gum arabic" from licking stamps on her greeting cards, but this is not considered a "performance-enhancing" substance, yet.)

User avatar
GB 789
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
AQUA Shooting Star Board ADDICT!
Posts: 619
Joined: 28 Oct 2015 02:50
Location: Worcester, England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by GB 789 »

Have many other countries produced stamps for their gold medal winners like Australia for this Olympics?

Does Australia also produce stamps for gold medal winners in the Paralympics? Unfortunately, I think the reason Royal Mail doesn’t repeat its offerings from 2012 is because of the pressure of needing to produce stamps for both the Olympics and Paralympics. Whether caused by political correctness or otherwise, it would result in an extra 50-60 stamps each Olympics year which wouldn’t go down well with collectors.

User avatar
gavin-h
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Posts: 33367
Joined: 01 Apr 2007 02:10
Location: West Coast of England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by gavin-h »

GB 789 wrote:
09 Aug 2021 22:48
Unfortunately, I think the reason Royal Mail doesn’t repeat its offerings from 2012 is because of the pressure of needing to produce stamps for both the Olympics and Paralympics. Whether caused by political correctness or otherwise, it would result in an extra 50-60 stamps each Olympics year which wouldn’t go down well with collectors.
I think the level of interest shown in the Paralympics in this thread will be telling in that respect. :idea:

User avatar
emason
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 1667
Joined: 30 Nov 2015 08:37
Location: North Yorkshire, England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by emason »

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/08/08/olympian-effort- ... s-charity/

Olympian effort: Couple complete all 102 events at Tokyo games for charity

17-day challenge saw the pair skateboard, climb, box, shoot, run and lift weights to raise money for the Motor Neurone Disease Association.

A British couple have successfully completed all 102 Olympic events over the duration of the Tokyo games for a charity fundraiser.

Charlotte Nichols and Stuart Bates, from Oxford, took on the 17-day challenge in honour of Mr Bates’s brother Spencer, known as Spenny, who died 10 years ago from motor neurone disease.

Despite first aiming to raise £10,000, donations for the “Spennylympics” have now surged to more than 11 times that.

The total reached £111,000 as the pair crossed the line on their final event - a 26.2-mile run culminating on Weymouth beach in Dorset.

“It was really hard, there were tears, there were points when we were like, ‘Oh, God’, but we finished it and it feels amazing to have done it,” Ms Nichols, a 21-year-old student doctor, said shortly after finishing.

Since July 23, Ms Nichols and Mr Bates have completed an array of events including skateboarding, climbing, boxing, weightlifting, shooting, show jumping and rhythmic gymnastics.

Rather surprisingly, though, Mr Bates cited trampolining as his toughest event due to a problem he had with his back.

“I never want to see a trampoline again as long as I live,” he said. “Give me two marathons but no more trampolining.”

The couple held hands and were cheered by onlookers as they finished the very last leg of their journey on Sunday afternoon, minutes after the closing ceremony in Tokyo.

Mr Bates said it was “just super special” to complete the event in Weymouth, where his brother had lived.

“It just felt like coming home and the reception at the end was just astonishing, all of our family there cheering us home,” he said.

The pair have also received the backing of several real Olympians, past and present, during recent weeks - including silver medal-winning athlete Keely Hodgkinson and gold-winning kayaker Liam Heath.

It was not a smooth ride through the events, however, with Mr Bates thrown from his horse during cross country and Ms Nichols having to be rescued while windsurfing due to a phobia of fish.

The couple are raising money for the Motor Neurone Disease Association, which helped Spencer during the final years of his life.

Mr Bates, 51, a window cleaner, said: “It is so hard to watch someone you love living with motor neurone disease. It’s 10 years since Spencer passed but I still think about him every single day.”

The couple’s efforts have drawn donations from thousands of people across the world.

“It gives us an awful lot of pride but also so much motivation,” Mr Bates said.

“We woke up yesterday and our bodies were in pieces, but we read a few messages from these people and we got up, dusted ourselves off and got out.”

As well as financial support, dozens of sports clubs offered training and equipment to help them complete their challenge, while the University of Bristol provided free access to its facilities and assistance from performance coaches.

Mr Bates and Ms Nichols said they would have a “few drinks” with friends and family to celebrate before taking a bit of time to recover.

However, their fundraising efforts are far from over.

“Watch this space, it’s not the end of Spennylympics,” said Mr Bates.

The couple’s fundraising page for the Motor Neurone Disease Association can be found at https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/spennylympics
Best wishes,
Bill

User avatar
bazza4338
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 119677
Joined: 12 Dec 2009 16:50
Location: Korumburra Vic. Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by bazza4338 »

GB 789 wrote:
09 Aug 2021 22:48
Have many other countries produced stamps for their gold medal winners like Australia for this Olympics?

Does Australia also produce stamps for gold medal winners in the Paralympics?

Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000
Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000


Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000
Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000


Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000
Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000


Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000
Australia Post Paralympics stamps 2000

User avatar
bazza4338
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 119677
Joined: 12 Dec 2009 16:50
Location: Korumburra Vic. Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by bazza4338 »

Australia Post Olympics Gold Medal Winners Tokyo 2020


https://auspost.com.au/shop/collectables/olympics

Austpost Tokyo 2020 Olympic Gold Medal Winners
Austpost Tokyo 2020 Olympic Gold Medal Winners



Screenshot 2021-08-11 015736.jpg


Screenshot 2021-08-11 015804.jpg

User avatar
Global Administrator
The Sheriff
The Sheriff
Posts: 64921
Joined: 18 Apr 2007 22:57
Location: Tombstone
Contact:

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Global Administrator »

GB 789 wrote:
09 Aug 2021 19:57

Compared to 25 years ago in Atalanta when UK won 1 gold medal, compared to now, I don’t think there has been a bigger success story in recent years, certainly not a ‘failure’.

A shame to read that illegal Testosterone style drugs, appear to have contributed to part of the same UK "success story". :roll:


The British sprinter CJ Ujah has been provisionally suspended for an anti‑doping rule violation after testing positive for two banned substances after winning a silver medal in the 4x100m relay at the Tokyo Olympic Games.

The news means that the Team GB men’s 4x100m relay team all face being stripped of their medals, with Canada being upgraded to silver and China receiving bronze unless Ujah can adequately explain how the substances got into his body.

If the suspension is upheld it would be the biggest doping scandal in British Olympic history, and will take some of the gloss off Team GB’s 65-medal haul in Tokyo. Ujah, meanwhile, would likely face a four‑year ban.

The news was confirmed by the Athletics Integrity Unit, which said a test on Ujah in Tokyo had shown the “presence/use of a prohibited substance (ostarine and S-23)”. Ostarine and S-23 are classified as part of a new class of drugs called selective androgen receptor modulators (Sarm). They are known to mimic testosterone by binding to hormone receptors in specific parts of the body.

The ITA also confirmed that, under World Athletics and IOC rules, if one athlete in a relay team was banned “the relay team shall be automatically disqualified from the event in question, with all resulting consequences for the relay team, including the forfeiture of all titles, awards, medals, points and prize and appearance money”, and said: “Given that the case is under way, there will be no further comments during the ongoing proceeding.”
.
Click HERE to see superb, RARE and unusual stamps, at FIXED low nett prices, high rez photos, and NO buyer fees etc!

User avatar
bazza4338
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 119677
Joined: 12 Dec 2009 16:50
Location: Korumburra Vic. Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by bazza4338 »

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-08-24/what-are-the-classifi ... /100378012

(Mods: When I try to post images from the above link or elsewhere, I receive this message: Error - The submitted form was invalid. Try submitting again)

What are the classifications for the Tokyo Paralympics? How do they work?



One word you will hear often referring to athletes and sports at the Tokyo Paralympics is classifications — but what are they and how do they apply to the Games?

At the Olympics, in most sports competitors are grouped by gender and/or weight class.

At the Paralympics, classifications are a way for organisers to group like-with-like athletes, so people of roughly equivalent levels of impairment — or roughly equal functional ability — can compete together fairly.

Classifications are eligible to be assigned to a range of physical, vision and intellectual impairments.

To make the Paralympics fairer, the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) conducted a review in 2019 of both the classification system and the process for athletes to be classified. This also included a range of eligible impairments.

Eligible impairments

Impairment of muscle power (muscle weakness)
Impaired passive range of movement
Limb deficiency
Leg length difference
Short stature
Hypertonia (muscle tension)
Ataxia (uncoordinated movements)
Athetosis (involuntary movements)

Vision impairment
Intellectual impairment

Physical impairments

Impairment of muscle power

Athletes in this category have conditions that either limit or take away their ability to move or make sporting actions such as generating force — to lift, hit, push, throw or otherwise move objects.

Athletes may have spinal cord injuries such as tetraplegia (paralysis affecting arms and legs) or paraplegia (paralysis affecting the lower half of the body), or conditions like muscular dystrophy or spina bifida.

Impaired passive range of movement (restricted joints)

This category includes athletes who have restricted movement or tightness in a joint or joints due to conditions such as joint fusions.

Limb deficiency

For athletes who have partial or missing bones and joints. This may be due to complications at birth, or due to later amputations because of illness or trauma.

Leg length difference

This category is for athletes who have a significant difference in leg length caused by either a deficiency at birth or later trauma.

Short stature

Athletes with short stature have a reduced standing height and length in bones in their arms, legs and / or trunk. This can be caused by bone growth disorders like achondroplasia.

Hypertonia (muscle tension)

Athletes with increased muscle tension and reduced ability for muscles to stretch, usually caused by damage to the central nervous system. This can be from conditions such as cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury or stroke.

Ataxia (uncoordinated movements)

Athletes in this category have uncoordinated movements due to damage to the central nervous system. This can be from conditions such as cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, stroke or multiple sclerosis.

Athetosis (involuntary movements)

This category involves athletes who have slow involuntary movements from conditions such as cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury or stroke.

Vision impairment

Athletes with impairment of the eye, optic nerves or pathways, or the vision area of the brain, resulting in vision loss.

This can be caused by a number of conditions including macular degeneration, cone rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

Athletes will have a wide range of impairment, which can be as manageable as requiring contact lenses or glasses, or as severe as full blindness.

There is a basic three-category classification system for the various sports that are open to visually impaired competitors, such as football (five-a-side), goalball and judo.

In other sports like athletics and swimming, which include sections for visually impaired athletes, the classifications will be numbered 11-13, where 11 is for the most seriously impaired athletes and 13 for the least seriously impaired.

Visually impaired swimmers are usually assisted by "tappers", who warn swimmers by tapping them on the shoulder with a pole to alert them about the approaching wall and the need to turn or make the touch.

The basic categories are:

B1: Athletes must have no ability to perceive light in either eye, or some ability to perceive light, but an inability to recognise the shape of a hand at any distance or in any direction.
B2: Athletes in this classification are able to recognise the shape of a hand to a standard of vision of 2/60 and/or have a field of vision of less than five degrees.
B3: Athletes in this classification have a standard of vision between 2/60 and 6/60 and/or a field of vision greater than 5 degrees and less than 20 degrees.

Intellectual impairment

This refers to a limitation in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviour shown in conceptual, social and practical adaptive skills, which is observed before the age of 18.

Intellectual disability sport classifications were removed from the Paralympics after the Sydney Games in 2000. This followed the scandal of the Spanish basketball team, which was stripped of the gold medal after it was revealed that 10 members of the team had only posed as having an intellectual impairment.

The classification was only restored in 2010 in time for the Paralympics in London two years later.

So, how do the classifications apply by sport?

Classifications are assigned to the above eligible impairments in order to create fairness in competition.

Numerical classifications are then used to cater for differing levels of impairment — or to put it another way, to cater for differing levels of functional ability.

The ability to hold a bow steady in archery, to hold and swing a racquet in tennis, to manoeuvre a wheelchair, move around a court on foot, see the course in sailing, or a myriad other important skills all have to be measured and athletes graded.

Archery

Competitors in archery are divided into two classes, W1 and Open.

W1: These athletes are wheelchair users with impairment in all four limbs and a clear loss of muscle strength, coordination or range of movement.
Open: This class is for wheelchair users with arms showing normal function but serious impairment in trunk and legs. Some athletes may choose to stand for the event, requiring support for balance.

Athletics

Competitors in track and field events are divided into several groups of classifications.

The first letter gives you T for a track event and F for a field event.

A two-digit number is used — the first digit tells you the category of impairment and the second digit tells you the degree of impairment. Looking at the second number, the lower the number, the greater the degree of impairment.

T11-13: Athletes in these classifications have varying levels of visual impairment. Athletes in T (and F) 11 are required to wear eyeshades to ensure a fair competition.
T20: Athletes have an intellectual impairment

T/F 31-38: Athletes with cerebral palsy

T32-34: These athletes compete in wheelchair racing events.
F31-34: These athletes compete in a seated position, in a throwing chair.
T35-38: These athletes compete in running events.
F35-38: These athletes compete in standing events.

T/F 40-41: Athletes with short stature.

T/F 42-44: Athletes with impairment in one or both legs, often requiring a prosthetic. Also includes athletes with impaired muscle power, impaired range of movement or leg length differences.

T45-47: Athletes with impairment in one or both arms.

T51-54: Wheelchair athletes

T51-52 have impairment in upper and lower limbs, T53 have fully functioning arms but no trunk function and T54 have partial trunk and leg functions.

F51-57: Wheelchair field athletes

F51-53 have limited function in shoulders, arms and hands and no trunk or leg function, such as athletes with a spinal cord injury. F54 have normal arm and hands function. F55-57 have increasing levels of trunk and leg function.

T/F 61-64 Athletes with a leg deficiency who compete with a prosthesis.

Badminton

This new event is open to players with a range of physical impairments. Players compete either standing or in wheelchairs.

The first three classes compete on a half-width court, the second three on a full-width court.

WH1: This classification is for wheelchair players with impairment in their torso and both legs. Players hold on to the chair with their non racquet-holding hand for balance.
WH2: Wheelchair category. These players are able to lean out of their chair to take a shot.
SL3: Standing players category. These competitors have an impairment in one or both legs, which affects movement and balance. Players have reduced court movement.
SL4: Standing players category. These competitors have an impairment in one or both legs, but good court movement and a good range of shots.
SU5: These players have an impairment in one or both arms - it may be in the playing or non-playing hand. They have good court movement and shots.
SS6: Players with short stature.

Boccia

BC1: This category is for both throwers and foot players (those who kick the balls to the jack). Athletes can have help from an assistant, who can hold the player's wheelchair steady or adjust it, and can give the ball to the player for the next attempt, if the player asks for it.
BC2: This category is for throwing players only. No assistance can be given to players in this section of the competition.
BC3: This category is for players with a very advanced physical impairment. Players use a device such as a ramp to assist them and also can be helped by a nominated person at the court. However the assistant must keep his/her back to the court, so they cannot give advice on where to throw or kick the next ball to get close to the jack.
BC4: This category applies to people with other serious impairments not covered by the three other categories. Players are not allowed assistance.

Canoeing

The Paralympic sport of para-canoeing involves competitors with physical impairments, grouped into three sport classes.

Events are held over distances of 200 metres. There are two categories of boats used, the kayak and the va'a (outrigger).

Kayaks

KL1: Athletes in this category have no trunk function or very limited trunk function, and no leg function.
KL2: Athletes in this category have partial leg and trunk function. They can sit upright in the kayak, and will have limited leg movement while paddling in the race.
KL3: Athletes with trunk function and partial leg function. Athletes in this category have conditions including muscular dystrophy, spina bifida and tetraplegia.

Va'a

VL1: Athletes use their arms and shoulders to paddle and keep control of the boat. They usually have a strap around their trunk to keep them in position.
VL2: Athletes in this category have partial leg and trunk function. They use their arms and torso to paddle, and have decreased balance.
VL3: Athletes with a leg impairment. They use their torso and arms to paddle.

Cycling

H1-5: Handcycling — competitors race on bikes with two big wheels at either end. They sit in the middle and use a hand pump rather than pedals to propel themselves forward.

These competitors usually require a wheelchair for mobility or are unable to use normal bikes or tricycles because of severe lower limb impairment.

Cyclists in H1-4 compete in a reclining position. H1 athletes have no trunk or leg function and limited arm function. H4 athletes have no leg function but good trunk and arm function.

H5 athletes compete in a kneeling position and use their arms and trunk to make the handcycle go faster.

Tricycle sport classes

Athletes who cannot ride a bicycle due to balance issues or restriction in ability to pedal, can compete in tricycle events.

Athletes in T1 have a more serious impairment than those in the T2 category.

Tandem

TB: Visually impaired cyclists compete in events sitting behind sighted guides on tandem bicycles. B1, B2 and B3 cyclists compete in the one event.

Physical impairment

C1-5: Cyclists with a physical impairment such as cerebral palsy or an arm or leg amputation.

C1, C2, C3, C4 and C5 are determined based on functional ability, with separate events for men and women.

C1 athletes have the most serious impairment, while those in C5 have the lowest level of impairment.
Equestrian

Grade I: These riders are mainly wheelchair users. They have poor trunk balance and/or impaired function in all four limbs.
Grade II: Most riders are wheelchair users. They have severe movement impairment of the trunk and minimal impairment of the arms, or moderate impairments of all four limbs and the trunk.
Grade III: Some riders may be wheelchair users. They have severe impairments in both legs with minimal impairment of the trunk, or alternatively have moderate impairments of all four limbs and the trunk.
Grade IV: These riders have a severe impairment or deficiency of both arms or a moderate impairment in all four limbs or short stature. Grade IV also includes riders with a serious visual impairment (B1). Athletes are able to walk and generally do not need a wheelchair.
Grade V: Riders with a mild impairment affecting movement or muscle strength or a deficiency in one limb or a mild deficiency in two limbs. Also includes athletes with vision impairment (B2).

Football: Five-a-side (for visually impaired athletes)

The five-a-side version of the sport was introduced at the Athens Games of 2004. There are no offside rules. All four outfield players, who are classed B1, must wear eyeshades.

The goalkeeper is sighted but cannot leave the area. There are three sighted guides, to direct players toward the ball when it arrives in their third of the field.

The guides are the goalkeeper in defence, the coach in midfield and another guide in attack. The football contains ball bearings to allow competitors to hear its approach.

Goalball

Goalball is played by visually impaired athletes wearing eyeshades and matches are played in silence.(Getty Images: Dennis Grombkowski)

Goalball is played by visually impaired athletes — there is no formal classification, since all participants wear black-out masks to ensure fairness.

Similar to five-a-side football, the ball has bells in it to orient players. There is total silence in the arena while the ball is in play.

Judo

Visually impaired athletes compete in judo.

Players are split into weight categories rather than classifications. Athletes begin each bout holding on to each other, or gripped up.

Powerlifting

Competition is open to athletes from all of the eight physical impairment classes. The only ineligible classes are intellectual impairment and visual impairment.

All athletes have an impairment in their leg or hips, which prevents them from competing in able-bodied (standing) weightlifting. They compete in the bench press.

Powerlifting is divided into 10 different weight divisions. The athlete who lifts the greatest weight is the winner in each division.

Rowing

PR1: These rowers have minimal or no trunk function, who use their arms and shoulders to propel the boat. They need to be strapped to the boat or seat due to poor sitting balance.
PR2: These rowers have functional use of their arms and trunk but cannot use a sliding seat due to loss of leg function.
PR3: Includes rowers who are able to slide a seat through residual leg function and also athletes with a vision impairment.

Shooting

Competitors are divided into classes depending on their degree of trunk functionality, balance while seating, muscle strength and mobility of upper and lower limbs.

There are also events for competitors with vision impairment, who receive may audio cues to help aim at the target.

SH1: This classification is for Pistol and Rifle competitors that do not require a shooting stand. The pistol class has athletes with an impairment affecting one arm and/or the legs. The rifle class involves athletes with impairment in their legs, such as amputations or spinal cord injuries.
SH2: This rifle classification is for competitors who are unable to support the weight of the firearm with their arms. These competitors require a shooting stand. Some have impairments in both arms and legs. Most athletes will compete in a sitting position.

Swimming

Athletes with all 10 impairment classes are eligible for swimming. Swimmers are categorised into different groups depending on their functional ability to perform a particular stroke.

Again, the lower the number, the greater the impairment's impact on functional ability.

S1-10: These categories are for competitors with physical disabilities.

The classes rank highest to lowest in terms of level of disability, so S1 is for the most seriously impaired swimmers, while S10 is for those with the mildest form of impairment.

S1 SB1: Swimmers with significant loss of muscle power or control in arms, legs and hands. Some also have limited trunk control. These swimmers usually use a wheelchair in daily life.
S2 SB1: Swimmers who rely mainly on their arms. Hand, trunk and leg function is limited due to tetriplegia or co-ordination problems.
S3 SB2: This class includes swimmers who have amputations of both arms and legs. Also includes swimmers with reasonable arm function but no trunk or leg function, and those with severe co-ordination problems with all limbs.
S4 SB3: Swimmers who cannot use their trunk or legs but can use their arms and have fair function in their hands. Also includes athletes with amputations of three limbs.
S5 SB4: Swimmers with short stature and an additional impairment, with loss of control over one side of their body or paraplegia.
S6 SB5: Swimmers with short stature or amputations of both arms, or moderate co-ordination problems on one side, etc.
S7 SB6: This class has swimmers with one leg and one arm amputated on opposite sides of the body, or paralysis of one leg and one arm on one side. Swimmers who have some leg function but full arm and trunk movement can also compete.
S8 SB7: Single-arm amputee swimmers can compete in this class, as well as swimmers who have extensive restrictions of their joints in hips, knees and ankles.
S9 SB8: Swimmers in this class compete with double below-the-knee amputations, or with joint restrictions in one leg.
S10 SB9: These swimmers have the lowest level of physical impairments allowed. Swimmers who have one hand amputated or restricted movement in one hip joint are two examples.

Vision impaired swimmers

S/SB11-13: These categories are for swimmers with visual impairments — S11 swimmers must use blackout goggles in all events to ensure fair competition.
S14: This category is for swimmers with an intellectual impairment.

Prefix S is for freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events. SB shows the class for breaststroke, while SM is for individual medley events.

Within classes, swimmers may start with a dive or from the water. Some swimmers will have different classifications in different strokes, depending on the necessary movement involved.

Table Tennis

Table tennis has 11 different classifications, relating to physical or intellectual impairments

1-5: These classifications are for athletes in wheelchairs, with class 1 for the most severely impaired and class 5 for the lowest level of impairment.
6-10: These classifications are for those who compete while standing. Again, class 6 is for the most severely impaired and class 10 for the lowest level of impairment.
11: This class is for athletes with an intellectual impairment.

Taekwondo

This new event is open to athletes with a physical impairment, or a vision or intellectual impairment.

There are two taekwondo disciplines - Kyorugi (sparring) and poomsae (martial arts). Only Kyorugi events are at the Paralympics.

For athletes with restricted joints, muscle weakness or loss of limbs

K 43: Athletes with impairments in both arms below the elbow joints.
K 44: Athletes with impairments in one arm at the wrist or elbow or in the ankle and foot.

Only Kyorugi events for K44 and certain weight classes are part of the Paralympics - however athletes in K43 can also take part in those events.
Triathlon

This event was first listed on the Paralympic program in Rio in 2016. It consists of a 750m swim, a 20km cycle and a 5km run.

PTWC1 and PTWC2 (wheelchair racing para triathletes)

These athletes swim, cycle using a handbike and compete in a racing wheelchair for the run leg.

The two classes have different limits on activity based on their trunk and hip functions. They compete together using a start interval system.

PTS2-5: Ambulant (Walking) Para Triathletes

As with other sports, the higher the number, the lower the level of loss of physical function. They have a range of impairments including loss of muscle strength, loss of range of movement and loss of limbs.

PTS2: This class includes athletes with a severe degree of activity limitation resulting from impairments of, but not limited to, limb deficiency, muscle tension, uncoordinated movements and or involuntary movements, impaired muscle power or range of movement.
PTS3: Similar to PTS2 but with a significant degree of activity limitation.
PTS4: Para-Triathletes in this class have a moderate degree of activity limitation.
PTS5: In this class we have competitors with a mild degree of activity limitation.

Vision impaired

PTVI: Athletes with vision impairment - whether PTVI (B1) to PTVI (B3) compete in the same vent using a start interval system. Competitors in this class must swim, ride a tandem cycle and run with the same (sighted) guide through the whole race.

Volleyball (sitting)

Volleyball at the Paralympics is open to athletes with a range of physical impairments.

There are two classifications for athletes, VS1 and VS2.

VS1: These athletes have impairments that significantly affect core functions, including ankle or higher amputation, muscle tension, stiff knee / rigidity of bones, severe cases of missing or shortened limbs since birth, uncoordinated and involuntary movements, etc.
VS2: These athletes have impairments that affect core function to a lesser degree. This can include foot/feet amputation, stiff ankle / rigidity of bones, amputation of four digits on one hand, less severe uncoordinated and involuntary movements, etc.

There can be two players with VS2 on a team, but only one can be on court at any time. The other five on court must be VS1.

Wheelchair Basketball

Wheelchair basketball is open to athletes with a range of impairments, including paraplegia, lower limb amputation, cerebral palsy and polio. Not all athletes use a wheelchair in everyday life.

Players are ranked on their functional ability, from 1.0 for the lowest level of mobility, to 4.5 for the highest.

1.0: These athletes have no trunk control and cannot move forward or sideways or rotate to catch or pass the ball. The backrest of their wheelchair is higher and they are strapped in for stability.
2.0: They can fully rotate and lean forward somewhat which gives them a larger area to catch the ball. They also have a higher backrest and use strapping for support.
3.0: Athletes who can rotate and lean forward but cannot lean to the sides. They have better balances while sitting so have a lower backrest.
4.0: Athletes who can move forward and rotate, and can partially lean to the sides.
4.5: Athletes who can move forward, rotate and lean to the sides. Athletes with a foot amputation or leg length difference qualify for this class.

Athletes are also able to be classed as 1.5, 2.5 or 3.5. Teams of five players must have no more than 14 points on the court at any one time.

Wheelchair Fencing

Fencing at the Paralympics is open to amputee, cerebral palsy and wheelchair athletes.

To level the playing field all must compete in a wheelchair, which must be fastened to the floor at an angle of 110 degrees, which puts both competitors' fencing arms level with each other.

The fastening to the floor means they cannot backpedal away from a lunge or attack from their opponent.

Class 1a: Athletes without sitting balance who also have a restriction in their fencing arm.
Class 1b: Athletes without sitting balance with less severe fencing arm restrictions than those in 1a.
Class 2: Athletes who have fair sitting balance and a normal fencing arm.
Class 3: Athletes with good sitting balance without the support of legs and who have a normal fencing arm.
Class 4: Athletes who have good sitting balance with the support of legs and a normal fencing arm.

Some classes are combined:

Category A events combine classes 3 and 4

Category B events are for class 2

Category C events combine class 1a and 1b.

Wheelchair Rugby

As with wheelchair basketball, players are ranked on their functional ability, from 0.5 for the lowest level of mobility to 3.5 for the highest.

0.5: This class is for athletes who have a significant impairment in shoulder, arm and hands movement. They catch the ball by scooping it in their lap and pass with a flick or bunt. These athletes' main role is usually as a defender.

1.0: This class if for athletes with more shoulder strength but have an impairment with elbow, wrist and hand function. They can throw the ball but are mainly used as a defender.

1.5: These athletes have fair arm function, particularly in shoulders and elbows, They handle the ball more than the earlier classes but have wrist or hand problems which makes it hard to pass accurately or keep control of the ball.

2.0: These athletes have good shoulder strength, and can push their chairs well, but have impairment or loss of finger function so they have limited ball security. Athletes with loss of hands and forearms can also be in this class.

2.5: These athletes have good shoulder, elbow and wrist strength, some trunk muscle control and may have some ability to use fingers. They are good ball handlers and fast moving players in attack.

3.0: Athletes in this class have excellent shoulder, elbow and wrist strength, with some finger or thumb or hand weakness. Athletes may have some trunk control. They can dribble with the ball and are play makers and ball handlers.

3.5: These athletes have excellent arm strength and good hand strength. They often have some trunk muscles which allows quick movement of the wheelchair, and they are capable of throwing long, accurate passes one-handed.

Teams of four players must have no more than eight points on the court at any one time - if a female player is on the court, the team gets an extra 0.5 allowed. For example, if a team has one female player on court, they are allowed a total of 8.5 points

Wheelchair Tennis

Athletes must have an impairment that affects at least one leg. There are two categories, open and quad.

In the quad division, the eligibility criteria requires players to have a permanent physical disability that results in substantial loss of function in one or both arms, and where at least three limbs are affected.

The open class is for athletes with other physical impairments who use a wheelchair (but do not necessarily use a wheelchair in daily life) - they need to have a permanent physical disability that means substantial loss of function in one or both legs.

Aside from the specially designed wheelchairs, the other main assistance for players (for quad athletes) is the option to have a special strap wound around their hand to help them hold the racquet.

Athletes are allowed two bounces of the ball, with the first bounce being inside the boundaries of the court.

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

2021-08-24_103728.jpg

A screenshot from your link Bazza.
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

EARLY TABLE TALLY. DAY 1.

2021-08-25_185721.jpg
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
fchd
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 1161
Joined: 02 Dec 2015 08:45
Location: St Columb, UK
Contact:

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by fchd »

Good start to the Games for Paralympics GB, one gold medal (her 15th) for Sarah Storey and a number of silver and bronze medals.

Twas almost a second gold for Tully Kearney in the swimming, she was a long way ahead in the S5 200m freestyle, but she struggled on the last length and the Chinese swimmer Zhang Li timed her challenge to perfection to pip Kearney.

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

CURRENT MEDAL TALLY.
2021-08-29_234320.jpg
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

CURRENT MEDAL TALLY. STUMPS DAY NINE.

2021-09-02_231826.jpg
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
Ubobo.R.O.
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 48407
Joined: 28 Dec 2017 11:07
Location: Golden Beach, Qld, Australia

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by Ubobo.R.O. »

FINAL MEDAL TALLY FOR THE TOKYO PARALYMPICS.

2021-09-06_095148.jpg
Full time horse non-whisperer, post box searcher and lichen covered granite rock percher. Gee I'm handsome !
You gottem birds, butterflies, shells, maps, flags and heads on stamps ? Me wantem !

User avatar
gavin-h
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Posts: 33367
Joined: 01 Apr 2007 02:10
Location: West Coast of England

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by gavin-h »

gavin-h wrote:
10 Aug 2021 02:30
GB 789 wrote:
09 Aug 2021 22:48
Unfortunately, I think the reason Royal Mail doesn’t repeat its offerings from 2012 is because of the pressure of needing to produce stamps for both the Olympics and Paralympics. Whether caused by political correctness or otherwise, it would result in an extra 50-60 stamps each Olympics year which wouldn’t go down well with collectors.
I think the level of interest shown in the Paralympics in this thread will be telling in that respect. :idea:
And that level of interest was a grand total of SEVEN posts during the Paralympics:

1. List of categories
2. An screenshot to illustrate the previous post.
3. An updated medal table
4. One post celebrating the achievement of the GB team in making a good start to the competition.
5-6. Two more updated medal tables.
7. The final medal table (which technically is after the games, not "during").

Surprisingly, nothing crowing about the achievements of the Australian team (with or without convoluted mathematical explanations as to how they out-performed those "Whingeing Poms"); nothing crowing about the Chinese "state-sponsored" athletes and nothing crowing about how much it all cost, how few spectators there were or how little / how much TV coverage it received in any given part of the world.

A sad indictment really. :idea:

User avatar
fchd
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 7 MILLION!
Posts: 1161
Joined: 02 Dec 2015 08:45
Location: St Columb, UK
Contact:

Re: 2020 Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo - General Discussion

Post by fchd »

All in all, a very successful Paralympic Games for GB.

You can't compare the medal numbers directly to 2016 - Russia was completely absent, so the best comparison is to 2012 where GB won 34-43-43-120 medals. The 41-38-35-124 medal line this time around is pretty similar, with a welcome increase in gold medals included. Second place on the overall medal table, holding off the USA and Russia, was a bit of a bonus.

The spread of medals across sports matched the Olympic experience, if not exceeded it. GB entered competitiors in 19 sports and won hardware in 18 of them, returning home empty handed only in shooting.

Individual highlights included Reece Dunn's three golds, 1 silver and 1 bronze, another Lee Pearson clean sweep in the Para-Dressage and of course Sarah Storey also winning 3 golds taking her overall tally to an incredible 17!

Two other gold medals stood out to me - Tully Kearney's 100m S5 freestyle after being denied a day or two earlier in the 200m, and the Wheelchair rugby where we'd never won a medal of any colour, yet GB took first place with a win over the USA in the final.

TV coverage in the UK has been bigger than ever before, plenty of coverage on Channel 4 and More 4, with up to 16 concurrent live streams available on line. It's just a shame that many events were repeated numerous times while live sport was on elsewhere. The nightly magazine show "The Last Leg" that has highlighted disability issues in a humerous way since 2012 missed the mark a bit this time around, lots of it was very self-indulgent and unfunny.

Post Reply

Return to “'The Water Cooler' - A relaxing and FUN place to let off some steam ......”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests