"Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

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The difference between rust and toning?

Post by TheBear »

I have read through the threads on this board that discuss rust and toning. It would appear that rust is something you don't want to have at all, but toning is acceptable (but reduces the value of a stamp).

So, my question is, how can you tell what is toning and what is rust. I was up late last night looking through some of my pre-dec stamps (nothing valuable in them) and I either have a lot with rust on them, or a lot with toning on them. I am suspecting rust because I used to live in humid Mackay in North Queensland.

It is probably a Stamp Collecting 101 question, but I honestly don't know the true difference. Can someone explain - or show in pictures - the difference between the two to help me out?

My initial thought is that toning is generally on one side of the stamp, but rust goes straight through? :?

Thanks
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Post by iomoon »

Basically, rust grows from point-sources on a stamp or cover whilst toning affect the entire stamp or cover.

Generally, rust is orangy-brown spots.

You can find good info at the APS site

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Post by TheBear »

Thanks iomoon. I read the page you linked to in full - and quickly flicked through the other topics. Has some information on how to avoid rust stains, etc and caring for your stamps in general, some of which an amateur like me wasn't aware of. :oops:

Does anyone have anything more to help me out?
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Rust, etc.

Post by doug2222usa »

My sense has always been that toning comes from age or exposure to sunlight, NOT from bacteria, mold, or mildew action.

Rust, or more commonly "tropical stain" in the US, is the result of a tiny organism living on the stamp surface or adjacent materials, and may affect only part of the stamp, like the perf tips. This "rust" has nothing to do with the oxidation of iron.

Do most of you agree or disagree with this point of view?
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Post by gavin-h »

Doug,

Completely agree:

Rust = a red-brown fungal infection of the paper in spots

Toning = a general yellowing/browning of the paper due to ageing or exposure to light
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Post by TheBear »

Thanks for the responses everyone. As suspected, I definately have rust through the stamps I was looking at.

Fortunately though, I think a few of the others are actually toning based on your descriptions. :)
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Post by ozstamps »

Bear .. a bath in hot soapy water, and a slow dry in these stamp Drying Books, and a fair amount of your problems will be gone:

http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3329&start=200
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Post by attard44 »

Whichever method you use, you need to be careful where to place it, in order to ensure it does not get contaminated again. This is probably one of the best reasons not to leave stamps on the same album sheet; but to renew sheets every few years.

Lastly, in order to prevent the problem occurring in the first place, I store my stamps in a dry cupboard, and take the extra precaution of using "Damprid" in the cupboard. You will be amazed at the amount of moisture that it accumulated in the Damprid container even with a couple of months.

Len
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Post by ozstamps »

Len I was in Hobart last month and a dealer there showed me a small white piece of totally white paper.

It HAD been an unused block of Tasmania 4d blue imperf Chalons.

He had tried to clean up a rusty block with some kind of bleach, some genius at his club had suggested.

Original value a few $1000 - now waste paper.

I tend to stick to what I know works, and cannot ruin stamps. :)
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Post by attard44 »

Glen I am not an expert on rust and toning.

I am certainly not suggesting that anyone use it. On the other hand, I have had drastic bad effects with detergent that contained bleach many years ago.

Seems like one needs to be careful whatever method one uses?

Len
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Post by harry01562 »

A cautionary tale on the dangers of humidity... I have bought collections that have been stored in bank safety deposit boxes for years. That is usually a very dry controlled atmosphere. In more than one case, I found blocks, sheets and even individual stamps that had dried out completely.

Blocks have actually cracked and broken across gum lines, or between perforations, and I've seen stamps that cracked. This is usually caused by the effect of the drying both on the paper fibers and also on the gum. Here the effect of gum ridges can be a disaster.

Some humidity is necessary to properly store paper products. If you do use chemicals to eliminate or absorb moisture, it would probably be a good idea to expose the material so stored to an airing, in clean fresh air, at regular intervals.

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Post by GlenStephens »

harry01562 wrote:
Blocks have actually cracked and broken across gum lines, or between perforations, and I've seen stamps that cracked. This is usually caused by the effect of the drying both on the paper fibers and also on the gum. Here the effect of gum ridges can be a disaster.
Some postal museums wash all the gum off very early mint stamps for that very reason. The stamp can literally break in pieces .. due to the gum. :idea:

The early 1854 WA local printed issues were hand gummed with "black boy" plant gum. It was deep brown. If that is not washed off, the stamps DO tear apart .. I've seen it first hand. :roll: :roll:
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Post by AndrewWalker »

attard44 wrote:I am certainly not suggesting that anyone use it. On the other hand, I have had drastic bad effects with detergent that contained bleach many years ago.

Seems like one needs to be careful whatever method one uses?

Len
A key point with any method - try it on an equivalent but much less valuable stamp first!!

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Post by COLIN »

Hi

Personally, I use a 10% normal bleach solution. lightly rinse the stamp rubbing lightly between fingers (as if removing excess gum) then rinse in fresh water, change water and repeat a few times then dry as normal.
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Colin .. however use on a mauve stamp like your avatar and you'll generally have a TOTALLY WHITE stamp in 2 mins. :)
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Post by attard44 »

Colin I tried a 10% breach and 90% water solution once. Luckily I tried it on a badly torn WA stamp. The result: toning was gone, but so was some of the colour: a reddish stamp became a pale pink. It should also be remembered that the pigment of stamps is not the same on all stamps; some (late WA colonials) tend to lose some colour even by leaving them in plain water too long.

Didn't I once read somewhere that "IN THE OLDEN DAYS" collectors used to float stamps on water rather than drown them?

The moral of this is: before you attempt using chemicals, try them on an equivalent damaged one first.

Len
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Post by Skippy »

If Rust is Fungal....I wonder if it would be beneficial to treat albums with an anti-fungal spray? like Daktarin.
Treat them before the stamps go in. I wonder if this would work?

Any microbiologists out there ? :wink:

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Post by Skippy »

iomoon wrote:Basically, rust grows from point-sources on a stamp or cover whilst toning affect the entire stamp or cover.

Generally, rust is orangy-brown spots.

You can find good info at the APS site
iomoon, I've just been reading that link and am alarmed at the warnings against Photocopying stamps.
My thoughts jump to scanning, isn't it basically the same process ? Maybe we shouldn't be scanning stamps either ?

:quote from website:
We are beginning to realize that the light and heat involved in the photocopying process can have a deleterious effect on philatelic materials. Patterson (1998) points out that reasonable and appropriate photocopying of philatelic materials -- for insurance purposes, for example -- doesn't present an unacceptable risk. However, collectors who make multiple copies or who copy the same material frequently may wish to consider using digital copiers so as to minimize the effects of light scanning. Stamps and covers that show clear evidence of damage due to deterioration are probably best not exposed to additional potential danger from the photocopying process. Smith (1998) points out that international exhibitors commonly place their philatelic materials at risk in those venues where the exhibition committees or customs authorities require each exhibitor to furnish a set of photocopies of the exhibit, photocopies which commonly are not returned and thus cannot be used again. Smith (1998) suggests that photographs of the exhibits, although somewhat more expensive than photocopying, would be preferable because of the reduced exposure to intense light. :end quote:

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Post by waroff49 »

To add to the original query. I think there is less damage done by scanning than by photocopying. I believe the scanner works at lower temperatures and the light is not as intense.

I know my scanner never heats up to the temperature that the photcopier at work used to, after doing 50-100 copies. To get 50 copies from a scanner it is scanned once and then printed from the computer 50 times, whereas most of the p/copiers scan 50 times. Although I think some of the new smart p/copiers only scan 1 and print also.
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Post by COLIN »

Old style scanners used a bulb for the light source. New generation scanners like the Cannon LIDE range use LED's.

I might be wrong here, But i dont think LED's would cause any damage.

Rgds

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Post by ozstamps »

One scan will not affect ANYTHING!
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"Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by alltorque »

Hi All,

Just wanting some opinions on how you go about storing Rusted or Foxed stamps.

I have several "Blocks" that have varying degrees of rust/foxing that I would like to mount in my collections.

I have mounted them in separate Hagners but I am worried if I mount them in the same album of other stamps in good condition, will they "contaminate" the good material.

They are MUH so don't really want to "treat" them , but leaving them as is, will they only deteriorate more over time?

Any opinions appreciated.

Cheers,

Ian
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by GlenStephens »

Foxing/rust is a living mould growth and is air borne via spores.

If you MUST keep mouldy stamps, do so in another room to the good ones, or others will be infected soon enough.

And soon your few ratty blocks will be a few 100 ratty blocks. :idea:
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by warm »

An exhibition entry on Rust would be a sure winner.

I know the keen collectors would know how to start this.

We could show:-

1. the stages of development as the fungi take over. Are there different colours?

2. the development of the spread from the stamps to the actual album page

3. The development and growth of spores in nearby stands

4. finally the continued growth into all new exhibits in those stands in future exhibits

5. This exhibit would be remembered for years.........

Any other ideas on how it could be developed??

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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Allanswood »

Your located in WA, so unless you store them in a regularly hot (above 28c) and humid (above about 50%) environment, (you must have both), you will never have a problem and it cannot spread.

The spores, (if that is what they really are), are always there in the air, everywhere, but unless in their ideal conditions, completely inactive and cause no harm.

If your room is regularly air conditioned even if in a hot humid climate, it can't occur.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Global Administrator »

Allanswood wrote:
The spores, (if that is what they really are), are always there in the air, everywhere, but unless in their ideal conditions, completely inactive and cause no harm.
Amazing that anyone can type this. :roll:

Especially to someone very wisely asking for advice.

Glen
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by vikingeck »

Yes I Have just returned from a 3,500 mile drive Aberdeen to Cadiz to bring back the collected material of a deceased friend. I am horrified at the degree of foxing on much of his material - even comparatively recent acquisitions appear affected.

Lack of ventilation , no air conditioning , damp winters and hot summers in S Spain have done huge damage. The stuff we had to dump was horrifying.

The moral is keep it dry , air your albums by looking at them regularly . do not hoard , accumulate , get swamped by material that you are not going to sort soon and check regularly, If you have stuff that has lain around unsorted for years you have the potential for trouble.

This guy was not a collector he was a "Hoover" ( In case the brand is not familiar= a vacuum cleaner that sucked in everything)

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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by fletches1 »

GlenStephens wrote:Foxing/rust is a living mould growth and is air borne via spores.

If you MUST keep mouldy stamps, do so in another room to the good ones, or others will be infected soon enough.

And soon your few ratty blocks will be a few 100 ratty blocks. :idea:
This is one of the few times Glen does not go far enough in his explanation!!

Don't keep them in the same house, regardless. Rust infects.

Do not use the cheap Chinese Heavy "Flying Eagle" Brand Stockbooks, they will make things worse.

And NEVER store an album lying FLAT.

A sad story...


I just purchased a Czechoslovakian Collection, complete MUH from beginning to mid 1980's, including all the rare colour shades & Perfs , plus all the Mini Sheets.

Catalogue value, over 15,000 Euros, plus a premium for MUH.

I paid $600 AUD.

Why??

Because the owner had stored the collection lying flat and turned all his beautifully displayed & mounted MUH stamps into, Mint with gum inclusions.

At Least a $15,000 dollar loss to him, all because he did not use a little bit of sense.

Stamps need to have air circulated over them on a regular basis. Look at your collection as often as you can, check that the stamps are not adhering to the page.

And NEVER keep foxed /Rusted/Toned stamps, anywhere near any others.

Life is too short ......

We have a responsibility to the next Generation to protect these fragile pieces of History.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by wolseley16/60 »

I have just spent the best part of the last month 'cleaning up' my Oz State stamps, I was particularly unwilling to clean the mint stuff but realised it had to be done !!!

My method was ; boil up a jug of water then pour the boiling hot water into a steel bowl [holds the heat], place the rust affected stamps face up in the water anywhere from 2 minutes to 4 minutes on the surface [do not submerge them]

Then take them out & lay them face down on either clear thick white paper [with minimal or no acid in it] or special blotting paper for drying stamps [not sure of the name].

Change the water after each 'group' of stamps have gone through it; I. E. ; the first group will be red, 2nd blue, 3rd green & so on. In each of my 'groups' was roughly 70 stamps; a time consuming but critical operation.

Be very careful with the red/yellow/orange colours as these had the worst tendency to 'run' whilst in the water which is why I only 'floated' all the stamps on the surface, the results were surprising with most of the rust removed from most of the stamps.

The rust must be removed otherwise you'll end up with nothing......
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Allanswood »

Global Administrator wrote:
Allanswood wrote:
The spores, (if that is what they really are), are always there in the air, everywhere, but unless in their ideal conditions, completely inactive and cause no harm.
Amazing that anyone can type this. :roll:

Especially to someone very wisely asking for advice.

Glen
Then you go contact and ask museum conservators and paper archivists, research the to's and fro's of what causes rusting, analyse the over hyped urban myths that continue to this day to scare people then stick a badly rusted stamp beside and perfectly good one, store it in the correct environment to preserve the stamps and try and come back and tell me that the rust has spread to the good stamp - it will not happen.

It seems that everyone who deals in paper conservation, excepting stamp dealers, knows this. :shock:

It's not rocket science, it's biology 101 and the life cycle and breeding conditions of "rust" spores.

I'm still trying to find published unequivical proof from a reputable source, that rust on stamps is caused by any sort of mould or fungus.

The mould or fungus should have consumed that portion of paper or weakened the fibres making the paper fray in the very least. All it ever seems to do is turn white paper brown.

As I keep saying, if you live in the right environment you don't get rust.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by GlenStephens »

Allanswood wrote: It seems that everyone who deals in paper conservation, excepting stamp dealers, knows this. :shock:

It's not rocket science, it's biology 101 and the life cycle and breeding conditions of "rust" spores.
What rank nonsense.

alltorque can choose to believe the textbook theory of an amateur collector re his rusty blocks, and to whether the problem will spread, or listen to folks like fletches1 and myself who as experienced full time dealers have seen other people's stamp disasters for 50 years. 100s of times.

The same way a heart specialist knows about blocked aortas, and a Ferrari mechanic knows how to make a car go faster, any experienced stamp dealer knows a TON about foxing/rusting. It is called experience, and you do not gain that by reading Weeties boxes or 'Woman's Day'.

And your hare-brained theory that it does not spread via spores from nearby infected colonies, and that it is not an issue in WA is just that. Dangerous nonsense, IMHO.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by AMark »

wolseley16/60 wrote:I have just spent the best part of the last month 'cleaning up' my Oz State stamps, I was particularly unwilling to clean the mint stuff but realised it had to be done !!!

My method was ; boil up a jug of water then pour the boiling hot water into a steel bowl [holds the heat], place the rust affected stamps face up in the water anywhere from 2 minutes to 4 minutes on the surface [do not submerge them], then take them out & lay them face down on either clear thick white paper [with minimal or no acid in it] or special blotting paper for drying stamps [not sure of the name].

Change the water after each 'group' of stamps have gone through it; I. E. ; the first group will be red, 2nd blue, 3rd green & so on. In each of my 'groups' was roughly 70 stamps; a time consuming but critical operation.

Be very careful with the red/yellow/orange colours as these had the worst tendency to 'run' whilst in the water which is why I only 'floated' all the stamps on the surface, the results were surprising with most of the rust removed from most of the stamps. The rust must be removed otherwise you'll end up with nothing......
I have to try this wolseley16/60.

I have soaked stamps in boiling water to remove rust, with good results. But, I would like to try your method as well.

Also, don't soak the fugitive ink stamps. You will ruin them.

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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by mobbor »

Yet another thread on this apparently highly contentious topic.

It is obviously a very serious problem, but we aren't making any progress. If anything the discussion is becoming more abrasive & less informative.

Could the moderators please get together & work out a positive approach that will actually provide some helpful advice.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by GlenStephens »

mobbor this thread is titled -

" Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...? "

There is good advice given above re storing such stamps, by folks who know the answer.

i.e. keep anything with visually advanced rust WELL away from clean stamps. Several rooms away ideally.

If members choose to follow that advice, it is up to them.

What more "hepful advice" you want is anyone's guess. :roll:
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by kerailija »

I'm not a dealer or paper conservation specialist, but as I (try to) manage a somewhat large worldwide collection, I've had to dig into the subject over the years. So here's what I know (from the books and first/second experience)...

a) What collectors call foxing/rust CAN be fungi / mold - but it's not necessary.
Usually it's a combination of various issues.

b) If it is fungi/mold, then it can be one of thousands of species.
Each of these species have different living requirements. Most go inactive once the temperature or humidity level drop beyond specific levels (usually around 50% humidity, or 21-24 celsius degrees warmth); but some species thrive at way below levels.

c) Rescue mission... Detect, Isolate, Control, Treat

Detect - Blacklight is your friend. It shows organic growth and damages way before you notice them with bare eye.

Isolate - prevent further spreading, and pull out the stamp from collection (glassine+tightly sealed box will do fine).

Control - stop further damages by taking contaminated items to very low temp/humidity area. It will hopefully tame the organic growth.

Treat - clean the stamp (and other affected areas), or throw it away. As most of the stamps I have are not worth the cleaning effort, I throw them away).


d) Learn to live with it...

Fungi and spores are everywhere, so You can't escape them... The only mission you can do is to learn to slow down / control the inevitable process:

- Keep humidity level low,
- keep temperature low,
- don't take any (badly) contaminated stuff near your collection,
- check everything periodically,
- and use tweezers (or cotton gloves if touching items by hand)

There's no easy way out of it...It's much less work than dealing with badly contaminated collection (and possibly risking your home/personal health also).
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by mobbor »

Glen

Well the question might be slightly different but it's still only the same uninformed discussion.

How do you store rusted or foxed stamps?
Glen, Fletches1 -keep them separate, or others will be infected.
Allanswood- cannot spread
Vikingek- (in effect) dump them.

Altorque also asks..."will they only deteriorate more over time? "
Wolsely, Amark- the rust must be removed
Kerailija- clean or dump.

That's helpful?

My own opinion based on experience is that there is no point in just storing them separately. They need to be treated. But this is just another uninformed opinion. Why can't Stampboards organise a professional conservator to provide some real advice?
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Allanswood »

I wish certain ones would not take what I write out of context or summarised incorrectly.
I have never said and would never just say "cannot spread" without qualifying what I have written.
I do have some experience with paper and have done extensive research into rust/toning and the ageing of paper. I have contacted museums, libraries, art conservators and paper manufacturers to garner the best spread of accepted opinion on the subject. It has been researched for over 60 years worldwide and still - there is NO clear answer as to what causes the condition.

I could post the near 400 pages that I have so far - but who would read it? There seem to be a few that are just so close minded in their opinion (which I respect and do not belittle), that they simply refuse to consider any other possibilities.

But suffice to say the answer is not difficult and regardless of cause the treatment and storage is the same.

I have always said that if you store your stamps within the temperature and moisture content range that is recommended then you will not have a problem with rust.

Any rust you currently have will slow to a stop very quickly and the spores go inactive, current spores if there cannot reproduce.

The reason so many collections have been ruined is not just because it all spread everywhere, it is because they were all stored in long term hot and humid conditions. That's the same reason people will not buy stamps from such countries as India and question supplies and collections that have come from Queensland.

If there is a problem with the climate conditions in Perth, the storage answer is still the same - keep them cool and dry - it's as simple as that.

If you wish to read one source of balanced relevant information then please look up the "American Institute for Conservation of Historic Works" That's near 35 pages alone. (Yes the info is under review and I'm awaiting the update).


None if this information came from a "Weeties Box" or "Woman's Day" and I resent the implications of that assertion, that was just rude.
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mobbor
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by mobbor »

Allanswood

I'm quite happy to apologise if my summary misrepresented your position. Thank you for the reference to the American Institute....which I will certainly check.

My only other comment is that unfortunately, with limited funds & living on the front door steps of Queensland, keeping my stamps dry & cool is not a simple matter. But I have improved their storeage as best I can.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by alltorque »

Thank you all for your opinions on this matter.

My collections are in an area that is reverse cycle airconditioned most of the time..( due to lazy teenagers who dont pay the electricity bills!! )
They are housed in Hagners, in albums, inside hard covers ,vertically.
They are away from direct sunlight.
They get "aired "quite often as I enjoy looking at them and researching them.

I think these conditions are my best effort to preserve my stamps

......Getting back to the blocks that are affected......

I think I will err on the side of caution and " isolate" the " affected " blocks from my other stamps.
I think I will start with" floating" one minor value block and see how I go.
MUH is nice and retains value more... BUT....If not so "pretty " there goes the value...
With some other "minor " rust spot blocks , I will house them seperately in another room and recheck in a month??
Probably hard to notice difference but see how i go...
Again, thank you all for your repiles.
Cheers,
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Foxing and toning

Post by mpaulj781 »

Although I am building a collection of MNH Commonwealth stamps, how can I ensure they remain free of foxing and toning?

My stamps are mounted in Showgard mounts and are kept in a spare bedroom in Simplex albums.

However I come across so many stamps damaged by foxing and/or toning when purchased from overseas sellers I am somewhat concerned about my collection.

In fact, I have found it inadvisable to buy stamps from any dealer in tropical regions as I have rarely found their stamps to be free of such problems.

Although I live in the UK and any stamps purchased here are not likely to be subject to tropicalisation, I would still appreciate comments as to how to prevent future problems.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Global Administrator »

In the UK you are in a good climate for stamp storage. :mrgreen:
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Skippy »

Just an observation

My Father-in-laws collection was toned/foxed/rusted. Pre-decimal stamps stored in albums were the worst, stamps stored in glassines and paper envelopes were fine.

Decimals stored in stockbooks were affected, decimals in original postoffice packaging were fine.

I have a theory that rust is spread by fingerprints and even breathing on the stamps.

Laugh now, but when you look at an old 2 generation collection as a whole, you do see patterns emerging in regard to the extent of rust in some areas v's others.

Stamps in albums get handled more than those stored in glassines.

It is unfortunate that the best stamps, chosen to be housed in albums (the old grid page spring back hinge type for pre-decimal, and stockbooks for decimal) were the worst affected.

Spares, seconds and excess stored in glassines and envelopes or left in PO packaging did much better.

Climate wise The collection went from the Blue Mountains, to Sydney, then came to us at Central Coastal NSW.

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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Global Administrator »

Skippy wrote:
Spares, seconds and excess stored in glassines and envelopes or left in PO packaging did much better.
The key here is the word GLASSINE. :mrgreen:

The Aust PO philatelic envelopes from the 1970s-90s were also made of glassine.

It is waxed paper, and is a strong barrier to air borne moisture getting to goods inside.

I'll often buy large lots, where all contents all stored in the same place.

The material in PO glassine bags is perfect and the material loose in shoeboxes etc often has very noticeable foxing.

Same with paper envelopes. Often that has foxing, but contents are largely OK.

Any kind of barrier to the moisture in a plus down here. Hagners, FDC album pages etc are better.

Glen
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by jjarmstrong47 »

I have had a couple of antique books restored, one many years ago by the State Library. I remember asking one of the conservators what he did with pages with mould or rust on them.

He told me that the pages were separated out of the book then individually given a minute in a microwave oven which he claimed killed the mould and the spores. Unfortunately, it does not remove the discolouration.

This might be useful as a treatment where fugitive inks prevent the use of boiling water.

Once the rust has taken control, nothing I have found can remove the ugly stain without affecting the stamp image.

Then again, some of the chemicals that work can give you some great new shade varieties.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Szykney »

Glassine paper is created by a process that uses hard pressure rollers to make the paper resistant to moisture. Wax paper is something else, and would probably be as damaging to stamps as it was to the baseball cards I collected as a kid.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by JohnBenn »

Silly question :lol: ,(but it might work seeing that so many other methods have been tried above), has anyone tried to freeze mint stamps yet?

Boiling water works fine with used stamps,but you don't want to loose the gum on mint stamps.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Tuxon86 »

JohnBenn wrote:Silly question :lol: ,(but it might work seeing that so many other methods have been tried above), has anyone tried to freeze mint stamps yet?

Boiling water works fine with used stamps,but you don't want to loose the gum on mint stamps.
Freezing spore/mold would only make them enter a dormant state and would at best be a temporary fix, unless you are ready to go to extreme cold temperature and immerse your stamp in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen...
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by JohnBenn »

Tuxon86 wrote: Freezing spore/mold would only make them enter a dormant state and would at best be a temporary fix, unless you are ready to go to extreme cold temperature and immerse your stamp in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen...
Good point,and one might end up with cracked gum.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by Stapper »

Recently I bought an old collection, mounted on paper with hinges. The seller (who was recently retired) told me this was the old collection of his father (some mounted before WW II ant the whole lot not aired for decenies).

Several stamps from around 1880 have brown traces like rust wich is possible mold. There is no smell of fungus but there is a smell of old paper.

The stamps who have the red brownish stains are all used and not really valuable (but they have perfect denture, nice half cancellation or bullseyes and one not so common perfin).

I payed the lot 40 € and most stamps are mint - hinged (I do need to put those in the magic box to remove the hinges). So trowing away the 'foxed' stamps doesn't bother me.

My question is, if I boil this in water, dry them and put them in the microwave for a few minutes, will the eventual mold be killed ?

By the way, Belgium has a climate similar tho that of England.

PS, the ink used for the stamps doesn't run in water.
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Re: Rust and Foxing stamps....how to store them...?

Post by JohnBenn »

Stapper wrote:
My question is, if I boil this in water, dry them and put them in the microwave for a few minutes, will the eventual mold be killed ?
:lol: Sounds like you want to make dinner....Just boil the kettle,pour the water in a container,and leave the stamps in there for about 5minutes.Then lightly rub with your fingers the infected areas.Then you can dry them.
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